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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    I take two minutes to fix my dinner.

    If I'm not mistaken, I take two minutes to fix my dinner means the same as It takes me two minutes to fix my dinner. I'm not really sure if the first sentence is acceptable, but if it is, I wish to know if it's as common, in everyday English, as the second.

  2. teechar's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: I take two minutes to fix my dinner.

    Yes, the meaning is practically the same. I much prefer the second, but I do not use "fix" in that sense; I would use something like "make", "cook" or "prepare" instead. By the way, only two minutes seems very little time to make a meal.

  3. Key Member
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    #3

    Re: I take two minutes to fix my dinner.

    I'm not patient enough to cook. Cup noodles helps me a lot, although I know it's not healthy. I'd say three minutes is enough to prepare it. As for the verb to fix, I've seen "fix you a snack" and "fix you a drink", not sure if I've seen "fix my dinner".

  4. teechar's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: I take two minutes to fix my dinner.

    I think "fix" in that sense is more common in AmE.

    I had a takeaway for dinner tonight - chop suey. That took me zero minutes to prepare.

  5. VIP Member
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    #5

    Re: I take two minutes to fix my dinner.

    Quote Originally Posted by teechar View Post
    I think "fix" in that sense is more common in AmE.
    Is that also true with the phrasal verb"to fix someone"?
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

  6. Moderator
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    #6

    Re: I take two minutes to fix my dinner.

    Quote Originally Posted by tedmc View Post
    Is that also true with the phrasal verb [space] "to fix someone"?
    If you're thinking of the threat "I'll fix you!", that's dated, mobster-type language. Mr. Trump might still use the expression, but it would sound odd from someone younger than 65 or so.

    If you're thinking of to fix somebody something (as in "Let me fix you a drink"), that's everyday usage in my region. I don't know how much it's used elsewhere.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #7

    Re: I take two minutes to fix my dinner.

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    As for the verb to fix, I've seen "fix you a snack" and "fix you a drink", not sure if I've seen "fix my dinner".
    That's very common in American English.

    In my region and other Appalachian-influenced areas, fixing to (pronounced "fixin' to") is used as an auxiliary meaning "getting ready to, preparing to". This is not related to the "cooking" meaning.
    I am not a teacher.

  8. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: I take two minutes to fix my dinner.

    That's very common in American English.

    Not just in Appalachia either.
    Not a professional teacher

  9. Key Member
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    #9

    Re: I take two minutes to fix my dinner.

    My mouth is beginning to water, longing for some delicious cup noodles. But it's 9:25 am here....

  10. J&K Tutoring
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    #10

    Re: I take two minutes to fix my dinner.

    They do not mean the same.

    1. It takes me two minutes to fix my dinner.
    1a. I have made my dinner many times, and I have noticed that it usually takes (about) two minutes to complete the task.
    OR:
    1b. I can prepare dinner in 2 minutes.

    2. I take two minutes to fix my dinner.
    2a. Out of the 1,440 minutes in my day, I allot two of those minutes to the task of preparing my dinner.
    OR:
    2b. I take two minutes away from whatever I am doing at that time and I use those 'stolen' minutes to prepare my dinner.

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