Page 2 of 3 First 1 2 3 Last
Results 11 to 20 of 23
  1. Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • United Arab Emirates
      • Current Location:
      • United Arab Emirates

    • Join Date: Jul 2017
    • Posts: 385
    #11

    Re: Being, that, and which

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I don't think you've really grasped the use of "being" in such constructions. If you use it, there needs to be a clear connection between the "being" part and whatever comes at the end of the sentence. I would, as I think I said in a previous thread, enclose the "being" section in commas.

    1. Coca-Cola, being the market leader in soft drinks, can pretty much set its own prices.
    2. My boss, being one of the founders of the company, gets to make all the major decisions.

    In sentence 1, the meaning is that Coca-Cola can set the prices specifically because it is the market leader.
    In sentence 2, the boss gets to make all the major decisions specifically because he is one of the founders of the company.

    There are two things that puzzled me.

    First, what is the difference between "being", which, and that" when using commas.

    For example

    1-Coca-Cola, being market leader in soft drinks, can pretty much set its own prices.

    2-Coca-Cola, the market leader in soft drinks, can pretty much set its own prices.

    3- Coca-Cola, which is the market leader in soft drinks, can pretty much set its own prices.

    4- Coca-Cola, that is the market leader in soft drinks, can pretty much set its own prices. ( I think it is incorrect because it is nonessential clause.)

    I think number one and two are correct.

    What is the tense of "being"?


    ====

    Second.

    How to use "being" as a gerund without commas.

    Such as this sentence

    (the name of the books) being the course books publisher establishes the fact that the course books have been written and approved by internationally acclaimed writers. This sentence is taken from my previous thread.

    What is the tense of "being" in the above sentence?

    Why can we not use commas?

    What does "being" mean?
    Last edited by mrmvp; 12-Feb-2020 at 09:18.

  2. J&K Tutoring
    Guest
    #12

    Re: Being, that, and which

    Quote Originally Posted by mrmvp View Post
    I think it is verb to be.


    Will you please explain why number 1 and 3 are wrong?

    I guess "present perfect" . What I wanted to say that the company has been famous in soft drinks for three decades is about to halt its production.
    1. I was hoping you would write the sentence with the understood verb written in its correct form.
    2. 1-3 means numbers one through three. Post #7 explains one reason why #1 is wrong. Numbers 2 and 3 have the wrong form of to be.
    3. Pretty good. The company, which has been famous in soft drinks for three decades, is about to halt its production. Note the addition of the commas.

    A key element of choosing the right verb form for this sentence is the inclusion of the time reference of the three decades. The examples in post #7 do not include that past reference.

  3. Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • United Arab Emirates
      • Current Location:
      • United Arab Emirates

    • Join Date: Jul 2017
    • Posts: 385
    #13

    Re: Being, that, and which



    When to use being as gerund without commas such as my post #11

    What is it tense?

    These are the three sentences with correction.

    1-The company, being famous in soft drinks for three decades, is about to halt its production.


    2-The company, that has been famous in soft drinks for three decades, is about to halt its production. Can "that" used with nonessential clause such as sentence number two?

    3-The company, which has been famous in soft drinks for three decades, is about to halt its production.


    Thank you. I wish I can click "thank" and "like" more than one
    Last edited by mrmvp; 12-Feb-2020 at 12:25.

  4. Tarheel's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jun 2014
    • Posts: 19,101
    #14

    Re: Being, that, and which

    People can be famous. However, I have never seen a company referred to as famous except on this forum.
    Not a professional teacher

  5. jutfrank's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Mar 2014
    • Posts: 10,556
    #15

    Re: Being, that, and which

    Quote Originally Posted by mrmvp View Post
    When to use being as gerund without commas such as my post #11

    I don't think you're ready for that question yet.

    What is it tense?
    It does not have tense.

    Can "that" used with nonessential clause such as sentence number two?
    The best answer is no. That is, we teach learners not to do it.
    Last edited by GoesStation; 12-Feb-2020 at 17:26. Reason: Removed an extraneous word.

  6. Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • United Arab Emirates
      • Current Location:
      • United Arab Emirates

    • Join Date: Jul 2017
    • Posts: 385
    #16

    Re: Being, that, and which

    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    People can be famous. However, I have never seen a company referred to as famous except on this forum.
    You should google "famous companies" and see the results.

  7. Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • United Arab Emirates
      • Current Location:
      • United Arab Emirates

    • Join Date: Jul 2017
    • Posts: 385
    #17

    Re: Being, that, and which

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post

    I don't think you're ready for that question yet.


    If you give me an example, I will follow suit and write some examples.

  8. Tarheel's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jun 2014
    • Posts: 19,101
    #18

    Re: Being, that, and which

    Quote Originally Posted by mrmvp View Post
    You should google "famous companies" and see the results.
    That's not going to happen.
    Not a professional teacher

  9. jutfrank's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Mar 2014
    • Posts: 10,556
    #19

    Re: Being, that, and which

    Quote Originally Posted by mrmvp View Post
    If you give me an example, I will follow suit and write some examples.
    Okay. I'll try to keep things simple.

    Look at emsr2d2's sentence here:

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    1. Coca-Cola, being the market leader in soft drinks, can pretty much set its own prices.
    Now, let's change the position of the first two parts of the sentence:

    Being the market leader in soft drinks, Coca Cola can pretty much set its own prices.

    You can see now that this new sentence has only two parts instead of three. The meaning is the same but the sentence is simpler in structure. The comma is important to help make clear the logical relation between the two clauses, which is one of 'because'-ness or 'since'-ness.

    Here are two more ways to say the same thing:

    Since Coca Cola is the market leader in soft drinks, it can pretty much set its own prices.

    Coca Cola can pretty much set its own prices since it is the market leader in soft drinks.

    That's all fairly complicated because the sentences above are complex. There is a much simpler and commoner way to use being at the beginning of a sentence, which is when the -ing phrase is a gerund, functioning as the subject of the main verb in a sentence. Here is an example:

    Being an English teacher can be challenging.

    Unlike in the Coca Cola sentence, the highlighted -ing phrase is the subject in the sentence.

    Now you may go ahead and attempt to construct one or two sentences of your own. If you try to make a complex one, remember to include the logical relation between clauses.
    Last edited by jutfrank; 12-Feb-2020 at 22:24.

  10. Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • United Arab Emirates
      • Current Location:
      • United Arab Emirates

    • Join Date: Jul 2017
    • Posts: 385
    #20

    Re: Being, that, and which

    Thank you so much.

    Being here is similar in meaning to "since" or "because".

    1-Being a rich man, it does not mean I am happy.

    2-Since I am a rich man, it does not mean I am happy.

    3-I can drive a lorry, because I passed the driving test.

    4-Being invited to Sam's wedding, I will come early.




    In the following sentence, "being" doesn't come first as a subject or in the beginning of the second clause
    (after comma)

    Will you please explain the following sentence?


    (The name of the books) being the course books publisher establishes the fact that the course books have been written and approved by internationally acclaimed writers. This sentence is taken from my previous thread.

    Thank you.
    Last edited by mrmvp; 13-Feb-2020 at 00:03.

Page 2 of 3 First 1 2 3 Last

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •