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  1. Moderator
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    #21

    Re: Being, that, and which

    For number 4, you need having been invited.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #22

    Re: Being, that, and which

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    For number 4, you need having been invited.

    Thank you so much. After I read your post, I remember the construction

    Having done his homework, he went to gym.

    I can rewrite as " Because he has done his homework, he went to gym".

  3. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #23

    Re: Being, that, and which

    Quote Originally Posted by mrmvp View Post
    Being here is similar in meaning to "since" or "because".

    1-Being a rich man, it does not mean I am happy.

    2-Since I am a rich man, it does not mean I am happy.
    No, that's not right and those examples are not correct. I'm afraid you have not understood. The sense of 'because' does not come from the word being but from the relation between the clauses.

    The word being is not similar to the word since. The word being is simply a grammatical word (a linking verb) in present participle form. The verb be is in the -ing form because it has to be, grammatically. That is, it would be ungrammatical to use a finite form such as am or is or are.


    4-Being invited to Sam's wedding, I will come early.
    No, that is also wrong.

    In the following sentence, "being" doesn't come first as a subject or in the beginning of the second clause
    (after comma)

    Will you please explain the following sentence?

    (The name of the books) being the course books publisher establishes the fact that the course books have been written and approved by internationally acclaimed writers. This sentence is taken from my previous thread.
    I didn't say that being is the subject in any of the sentences we've so far mentioned. Read post #19 again.

    In the sentence above, the subject (in blue) is a participle clause. The whole blue clause is the subject of the sentence. Within that participle clause, the word being is a linking verb in the -ing form, the subject of which is the part that you've rather confusingly put in brackets, highlighted in bold.

    To say that again: the bold bit is the subject of the verb being and the whole blue bit is the subject of the sentence, i.e, of the main verb establishes.

    Please read our posts very carefully. Don't worry if you don't understand this grammar because it is really quite advanced. At the moment, it is beyond your current level. You should focus on more basic stuff first.
    Last edited by jutfrank; 13-Feb-2020 at 00:58.

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