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  1. Member
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    #1

    Being, that, and which

    Which of the following is correct?

    1-The company being famous in soft drinks for three decades is about to halt its production.

    2-The company that is famous in soft drinks for three decades is about to halt its production.

    3-The company which is famous in soft drinks for three decades is about to halt its production.

    4-The company famous in soft drinks for three decades is about to halt its production.

    Can I use subject as person followed by "being"? Such as the following sentence. Is it correct?

    Sam being the the school principal for ten years is to retire next month.

  2. J&K Tutoring
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    #2

    Re: Being, that, and which

    Actually, none of them are correct. I will set aside the fact that the definite article is not correct in these stand-alone examples, as I assume this is how they were presented to you. All of your examples need some punctuation, but thinking of just the words:

    1. Which one(s) do you like?
    2. If you think more than one could be okay grammatically, which one(s) are not grammatically correct?
    3. How would you correct them?

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    #3

    Re: Being, that, and which

    I think number three is incorrect because the clause is a restrictive that requires "that", not "which"

    In regard to sentence four, I think verb to be should be used before the adjective "famous".

  4. J&K Tutoring
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    #4

    Re: Being, that, and which

    #4 is the only one correct as written, though it needs some punctuation. The verb before famous in #4 is understood. Do you know what it is?

    Hint #1: Nos. 1-3 are wrong.

    Hint #2: What is the time frame of the company 'being famous'?
    Last edited by J&K Tutoring; 11-Feb-2020 at 16:06.

  5. Member
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    #5

    Re: Being, that, and which

    Quote Originally Posted by J&K Tutoring View Post
    #4 is the only one correct as written, though it needs some punctuation. The verb before famous in #4 is understood. Do you know what it is?

    Hint #1: Nos. 1-3 are wrong.


    Hint #2: What is the time frame of the company 'being famous'?


    I think it is verb to be.


    Will you please explain why number 1 and 3 are wrong?

    I guess "present perfect" . What I wanted to say that the company has been famous in soft drinks for three decades is about to halt its production.
    Last edited by mrmvp; 12-Feb-2020 at 08:43.

  6. J&K Tutoring
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    #6

    Re: Being, that, and which

    Quote Originally Posted by mrmvp View Post
    I think it is verb to be.


    Will you please explain why number 1 and 3 are wrong?

    I guess "present perfect" . What I wanted to say that the company has been famous in soft drinks for three decades is about to halt its production.
    1. I was hoping you would write the sentence with the understood verb written in its correct form.
    2. 1-3 means numbers one through three. Post #7 explains one reason why #1 is wrong. Numbers 2 and 3 have the wrong form of to be.
    3. Pretty good. The company, which has been famous in soft drinks for three decades, is about to halt its production. Note the addition of the commas.

    A key element of choosing the right verb form for this sentence is the inclusion of the time reference of the three decades. The examples in post #7 do not include that past reference.

  7. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Being, that, and which

    ... is about to halt its production.

    Do know what the "obvious" question is?

    Perhaps:

    Pepsi Cola, a well-known soft drink manufacturer, is about to halt its production of soft drinks. (They are going out of business.)
    Not a professional teacher

  8. J&K Tutoring
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    #8

    Re: Being, that, and which

    Okay, I'll bite. What is the obvious question?

  9. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Being, that, and which

    Quote Originally Posted by J&K Tutoring View Post
    Okay, I'll bite. What is the obvious question?
    J&K, you are not a learner, so that question wasn't meant for you. Also, there's a reason I put that phrase in quotes. (Hint: the question is answered in the same post.)
    Not a professional teacher

  10. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Being, that, and which

    I don't think you've really grasped the use of "being" in such constructions. If you use it, there needs to be a clear connection between the "being" part and whatever comes at the end of the sentence. I would, as I think I said in a previous thread, enclose the "being" section in commas.

    1. Coca-Cola, being the market leader in soft drinks, can pretty much set its own prices.
    2. My boss, being one of the founders of the company, gets to make all the major decisions.

    In sentence 1, the meaning is that Coca-Cola can set the prices specifically because it is the market leader.
    In sentence 2, the boss gets to make all the major decisions specifically because he is one of the founders of the company.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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