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  1. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    English Teacher
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      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 68,820
    #21

    Re: The mistakes that I never used to make

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    At 81, you can't be wasting precious nanoseconds typing commas you believe to be unnecessary.
    What's that after 81?

  2. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    English Teacher
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      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 68,820
    #22

    Re: The mistakes that I never used to make

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Well, there are a few full stops left over for the rest of us to use after someone wrote a 1000-page book that consisted of just one sentence.

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/201...-one-sentence/

    I've discovered it's not the first either. Someone else wrote a 224-page book consisting of one sentence.

    https://www.express.co.uk/entertainm...ldsmiths-Prize
    Georges Perec wrote a novel that did not have the letter e. Someone managed to translate it.

  3. Moderator
    Retired English Teacher
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      • England
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    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 29,354
    #23

    Re: The mistakes that I never used to make

    That reminds me that I once wrote a sonnet with no es. It's not easy. Do you want to read it?

    TO HIS COY LADY

    I cannot think that you can fail to know
    What passion lurks within this pounding brain,
    Or how a sight of you can thrill it so,
    And how I long to hold you tight again.

    I worship from afar your blissful charms.
    If you would murmur fond and loving words
    Whilst snuggling in my aching, waiting arms,
    I'd soar aloft with larks and hummingbirds.

    My hurting, pining longing think upon;
    Soon Cupid's darts may prick you too, and look –
    Romantic nights will follow, as for yon
    Bill Clinton or that gnomish Robin Cook.

    So darling, don't say no to your sad swain,
    But run to him and kiss away his pain.

    Rov*r_K* 1998
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 19-Feb-2020 at 09:01.

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