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  1. meliss's Avatar
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    #1

    Sally puckered up her nose

    Hi, the phrasal verb "pucker up" is mostly explained as "to contract the lips as in preparing to kiss" or " to shrink up and get wrinkled". I hardly can imagine Sally's nose getting wrinkled, but it may be. But further we have: "said Sally, puckering up her nose at me", that I can't understand at all.
    "“How marvellous!” Sally puckered up her nose and laughed a silvery little stage-laugh." "“You know, Fritz darling,” said Sally, puckering up her nose at me, “I believe the trouble with you is that you’ve never really found the right woman.” (Sally Bowles, Christopher Isherwood)

  2. Senior Member
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    #2

    Re: Sally puckered up her nose

    I can't imagine it either, nor can I imagine a "silvery little stage-laugh".

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    #3

    Re: Sally puckered up her nose

    It's more typical to talk of wrinkling one's nose, but Isherwood's phrase works. For example, a prune can be said to have a puckered skin.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. meliss's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Sally puckered up her nose

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    It's more typical to talk of wrinkling one's nose, but Isherwood's phrase works. For example, a prune can be said to have a puckered skin.
    OK, but what about "Sally, puckering up her nose AT ME"?

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Sally puckered up her nose

    It simply suggests that she turned her face towards "me" while puckering/wrinkling her nose.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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