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  1. #1
    beachboy is offline Key Member
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    It goes to show that...

    In everyday English, how common is it to drop the t when pronouncing the word it?

  2. #2
    SoothingDave is online now VIP Member
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    Re: It goes to show that...

    Not very. There are situation where Ts are dropped at the end of words, as they blend into the next word. But I can't think of any with "it."

  3. #3
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    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Re: It goes to show that...

    It's pretty common in BrE. Without wishing to sound snobby, it's more associated with the lower classes/less educated.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. #4
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: It goes to show that...

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    There are situations where Ts are dropped at the end of words, as they blend into the next word. But I can't think of any with "it."
    The thread title is one. I barely pronounce "it" at all when I say "it just goes to show" in ordinary conversation — but this depends on dialect and register.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. #5
    jutfrank's Avatar
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    Re: It goes to show that...

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Without wishing to sound snobby, it's more associated with the lower classes/less educated.
    I completely disagree.

    It's extremely common in all variants of English, including American English.

    It also has very little to do with class or level of education.

  6. #6
    jutfrank's Avatar
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    Re: It goes to show that...

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Not very. There are situation where Ts are dropped at the end of words, as they blend into the next word. But I can't think of any with "it."
    I'm sure beachboy is asking about the use of the word as part of natural speech, not about how the word is pronounced in isolation.

  7. #7
    SoothingDave is online now VIP Member
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    Re: It goes to show that...

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    I'm sure beachboy is asking about the use of the word as part of natural speech, not about how the word is pronounced in isolation.
    Yes, I understood. I was saying that where there are combinations like "Giant Eagle" (a local supermarket) where the T completely disappears in normal speech, I can not think of any phrase with "it" where the T in "it" goes away.

  8. #8
    jutfrank's Avatar
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    Re: It goes to show that...

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Yes, I understood. I was saying that where there are combinations like "Giant Eagle" (a local supermarket) where the T completely disappears in normal speech, I can not think of any phrase with "it" where the T in "it" goes away.
    You can choose pretty much any phrase. For instance: It goes away.

    As post #7 points out, although there is no /t/ sound there, there's still a trace (an unexploded glottal stop).

  9. #9
    SoothingDave is online now VIP Member
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    Re: It goes to show that...

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    Do you mean that you pronounce the part I have underlined in Giant Eagle in exactly the same way as you would the underlined part in Zion Eagle?
    Yes, that is exactly how it works in my dialect, unless one is deliberately speaking carefully. It's not a general thing, but with common names this is done.

    The neighborhood of East Liberty is said as "E Sliberty."

  10. #10
    jutfrank's Avatar
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    Re: It goes to show that...

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    Do you mean that you pronounce the part I have underlined in Giant Eagle in exactly the same way as you would the underlined part in Zion Eagle?
    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Yes, that is exactly how it works in my dialect, unless one is deliberately speaking carefully. It's not a general thing, but with common names this is done.

    The neighborhood of East Liberty is said as "E Sliberty."
    These two examples show a general difference between British and American patterns.

    In British English, there is something there in place of the /t/ sound at the end of Giant whereas in American English there typically isn't.

    However, in both variants, East Liberty is pronounced similarly (E Sliberty) with complete elision of the final /t/ sound.

    The difference is due to the different type of following sound, i.e., a vowel in the former case and a consonant in the latter.

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