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  1. VIP Member
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    #11

    Re: It goes to show that...

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    Do you mean that you pronounce the part I have underlined in Giant Eagle in exactly the same way as you would the underlined part in Zion Eagle?
    Yes, that is exactly how it works in my dialect, unless one is deliberately speaking carefully. It's not a general thing, but with common names this is done.

    The neighborhood of East Liberty is said as "E Sliberty."

  2. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #12

    Re: It goes to show that...

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    Do you mean that you pronounce the part I have underlined in Giant Eagle in exactly the same way as you would the underlined part in Zion Eagle?
    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Yes, that is exactly how it works in my dialect, unless one is deliberately speaking carefully. It's not a general thing, but with common names this is done.

    The neighborhood of East Liberty is said as "E Sliberty."
    These two examples show a general difference between British and American patterns.

    In British English, there is something there in place of the /t/ sound at the end of Giant whereas in American English there typically isn't.

    However, in both variants, East Liberty is pronounced similarly (E Sliberty) with complete elision of the final /t/ sound.

    The difference is due to the different type of following sound, i.e., a vowel in the former case and a consonant in the latter.

  3. VIP Member
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    #13

    Re: It goes to show that...

    I would not assume that Americans in general would say the name of our regional supermarket like we do. Our newscasters make sure to say it "properly."

  4. probus's Avatar
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    #14

    Re: It goes to show that...

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post

    It's extremely common in all variants of English, including American English.
    I must agree with both SoothingDave and Piscean.

    In AmE the furthest we go is to replace a final t with a glottal stop. Neither I nor anyone I know ever drops the final t completely.

  5. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #15

    Re: It goes to show that...

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    I must agree with both SoothingDave and Piscean.

    In AmE the furthest we go is to replace a final t with a glottal stop. Neither I nor anyone I know ever drops the final t completely.
    There seems to be two different interpretations here of what beachboy means in post #1 by "drop the t", which has confused the thread.

    I suppose you could say it better like this: We don't drop the sound, we replace the sound with a different one.

  6. Key Member
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    #16

    Re: It goes to show that...

    I'm going to have a mechanic fix IT for me.

    When I said "drop the t", I meant not only dropping the sound but also disconsidering the glottal stop, going straight from the vowel i to the f (for). That's what I heard a Brazilian saying. I found it strange, but didn't know whether to correct them or not.

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #17

    Re: It goes to show that...

    Now that you've said that you heard a Brazilian saying it, it makes more sense. I did a little impression of my Spanish students saying that sentence in English and I can see how "it" might sound more like a very short "ee" with no hint of a "t" at the end. I'm not saying that all my students would say it like that but certainly some would. That does not mean, however, that any native speakers (without an accent from another country) would say it like that.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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