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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    It goes to show that...

    In everyday English, how common is it to drop the t when pronouncing the word it?

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    #2

    Re: It goes to show that...

    Not very. There are situation where Ts are dropped at the end of words, as they blend into the next word. But I can't think of any with "it."

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: It goes to show that...

    It's pretty common in BrE. Without wishing to sound snobby, it's more associated with the lower classes/less educated.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: It goes to show that...

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    There are situations where Ts are dropped at the end of words, as they blend into the next word. But I can't think of any with "it."
    The thread title is one. I barely pronounce "it" at all when I say "it just goes to show" in ordinary conversation — but this depends on dialect and register.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: It goes to show that...

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Without wishing to sound snobby, it's more associated with the lower classes/less educated.
    I completely disagree.

    It's extremely common in all variants of English, including American English.

    It also has very little to do with class or level of education.

  6. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: It goes to show that...

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Not very. There are situation where Ts are dropped at the end of words, as they blend into the next word. But I can't think of any with "it."
    I'm sure beachboy is asking about the use of the word as part of natural speech, not about how the word is pronounced in isolation.

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    #7

    Re: It goes to show that...

    It's not true to say that the /t/ is completely dropped; /ɪgɘʊztɘʃɘʊ/ would not sound very natural. It is rather that the /t/ is realised as an unexploded glottal stop.
    Typoman - writer of rongs

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    #8

    Re: It goes to show that...

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    I'm sure beachboy is asking about the use of the word as part of natural speech, not about how the word is pronounced in isolation.
    Yes, I understood. I was saying that where there are combinations like "Giant Eagle" (a local supermarket) where the T completely disappears in normal speech, I can not think of any phrase with "it" where the T in "it" goes away.

  9. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: It goes to show that...

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Yes, I understood. I was saying that where there are combinations like "Giant Eagle" (a local supermarket) where the T completely disappears in normal speech, I can not think of any phrase with "it" where the T in "it" goes away.
    You can choose pretty much any phrase. For instance: It goes away.

    As post #7 points out, although there is no /t/ sound there, there's still a trace (an unexploded glottal stop).

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    #10

    Re: It goes to show that...

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    I was saying that where there are combinations like "Giant Eagle" (a local supermarket) where the T completely disappears in normal speech,
    Do you mean that you pronounce the part I have underlined in Giant Eagle in exactly the same way as you would the underlined part in Zion Eagle?
    Typoman - writer of rongs

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