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  1. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #11

    Re: Work in an airport

    Quote Originally Posted by Glizdka View Post
    I asked for one that would be incorrect. Can you think of an example where "work in [article][non-proper noun]" would not work?
    Sorry, I misread that.

    Not in principle, no. I mean, if the NP is seen as a space, then it would work in principle. If not, it wouldn't.

    I think I can think of an example where "work at [article][non-proper noun]" wouldn't work, though. Possibly only because I still don't get it; let's check.

    "I have a hearing problem. I work in a noisy factory where you can hear the deafening sound of the machinery even through headphones."

    Would "I work at a noisy factory" be fine as well in the context of the poor manufacturer?
    in would be much better suited to make your point because you'd want your listener to conjure up a picture of you being inside.


    I have absolutely no problem with that use of in whatsoever.

    It's not "work[preposition]" that I have a problem with. It's "[preposition][location]".
    I wasn't talking about work [preposition]. I was talking about [preposition] [location].

    By the way, it's not generally a good idea to connect any verb with any preposition (with rare exceptions), in my opinion, contrary to what the majority of teachers and coursebooks encourage.

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    #12

    Re: Work in an airport

    Now that I think about it, I have absolutely no idea why "in the park" is fine, but "in the beach" isn't. Both could be understood as a location, encompassing certain area, so either both should be fine with in, or neither.

    What makes beach not work with in if park works with it?

  3. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #13

    Re: Work in an airport

    Quote Originally Posted by Glizdka View Post
    Now that I think about it, I have absolutely no idea why "in the park" is fine, but "in the beach" isn't. Both could be understood as a location, encompassing certain area, so either both should be fine with in, or neither.

    What makes beach not work with in if park works with it?
    We just don't think of beaches like that in English. They're either locations (at the beach) or surfaces (on the beach).

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    #14

    Re: Work in an airport

    Quote Originally Posted by Glizdka View Post
    Now that I think about it, I have absolutely no idea why "in the park" is fine, but "in the beach" isn't. Both could be understood as a location, encompassing certain area, so either both should be fine with in, or neither.

    What makes beach not work with in if park works with it?
    Because we think of a beach as a relatively narrow place adjacent to a body of water, not as the kind of wide expanse that most parks consist of. But thinking about this reminds me of what a minefield prepositions are; you can be at the river's edge and on the riverbank at the same time.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #15

    Re: Work in an airport

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    I wasn't talking about work [preposition]. I was talking about [preposition] [location].
    Alright. I see no problem with fields of study and in.

    Bioengineering is a set of items, all of which must meet certain criteria to be qualified as belonging to the set bionegineering. Some of the items may be sub-sets on their own. It definitely sounds like a spacial entity using in with is completely appropriate, and using at with isn't, since a zero-dimensional point can't contain anything.

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    By the way, it's not generally a good idea to connect any verb with any preposition (with rare exceptions), in my opinion, contrary to what the majority of teachers and coursebooks encourage.
    Good we're on the same page.

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