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  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    times of melancholy

    Hello

    Right now, owing to the outbreak of this virus, everyone is sad and hopeless in my country.

    Can I use melancholy to describe this situation? Which one is correct?

    These are times of melancholy in our country.

    This is a time of melancholy in our country.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: times of melancholy

    You can use it. I prefer the second bold sentence.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Senior Member
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    #3

    Re: times of melancholy

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    You can use it. I prefer the second bold sentence.
    I have seen both "there are times of" and "this is a time of". Is there a difference between them in terms of meaning and usage?

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: times of melancholy

    Quote Originally Posted by alpacinoutd View Post
    I have seen both "these are times of" and "this is a time of". Is there a difference between them in terms of meaning and usage?
    I'd use "These are times of ..." for longer periods of time - perhaps years. For this (hopefully) short-lived crisis, I'd stick with "This is a time of ...".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. Senior Member
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    #5

    Re: times of melancholy

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    For this (hopefully) short-lived crisis, I'd stick with "This is a time of ...".
    Amen to that.

  6. Skrej's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: times of melancholy

    Any particular reason to use it as a noun? I prefer it as an adjective, where seems less overtly poetic or bombastic.

    'These are melancholy times.'
    "This is a melancholy time.'

    I can't really see any difference in meaning or usage between the plural and singular forms of 'time' in this context.

    I suppose you could argue that 'times' suggests a lengthier period, or a series of back-to-back troubled times, but that's probably stretching for a difference in this context.
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