Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. Newbie
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Jan 2016
    • Posts: 13
    #1

    Why ...ing form of verb?

    Can anybody tell me why we use the ...ing form of verb here?

    "The teachers are keen on the students taking part in the activities". Is it down to the preposition?

    Thank you

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 58,617
    #2

    Re: Why ...ing form of verb?

    Whenever we use "keen on" and follow it with a verb, the verb takes the -ing form.

    I'm keen on shopping.
    He's keen on swimming.
    They're keen on moving house as soon as possible.

    If you change it to "keen to", it's followed by the bare infinitive.

    I'm keen to shop.
    He's keen to swim.
    They're keen to move house as soon as possible.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Newbie
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Jan 2016
    • Posts: 13
    #3

    Re: Why ...ing form of verb?

    Yes I know that following a preposition we use the ..ing form, but...between "keen on" and "taking part" we have " the students", so is this still the case?

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 58,617
    #4

    Re: Why ...ing form of verb?

    The same rule applies.

    I'm keen on you buying me presents.
    I'm keen for you to buy me presents.

    He's keen on his brother playing for Liverpool.
    He's keen for his brother to play for Liverpool.

    We're keen on our daughter getting into Harvard.
    We're keen for our daughter to get into Harvard.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 72,269
    #5

    Re: Why ...ing form of verb?

    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline2000 View Post
    Yes I know that following a preposition we use the ..ing form, but...between "keen on" and "taking part" we have " the students", so is this still the case?

    Yes, because the words in the middle don't override the fact that it is keen on...taking part.

  6. Newbie
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Jan 2016
    • Posts: 13
    #6

    Re: Why ...ing form of verb?

    Thank you very much both of you.

  7. Newbie
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Jan 2016
    • Posts: 13
    #7

    Re: Why ...ing form of verb?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    The same rule applies.

    I'm keen on you buying me presents.
    I'm keen for you to buy me presents.

    He's keen on his brother playing for Liverpool.
    He's keen for his brother to play for Liverpool.
    Thank you, but as "for" is also a preposition, looking at your examples, it doesn't follow the same rule?
    Last edited by emsr2d2; Today at 18:05. Reason: Fixed quote box

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 58,617
    #8

    Re: Why ...ing form of verb?

    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline2000 View Post
    Thank you, but as "for" is also a preposition, looking at your examples, it doesn't follow the same rule?
    I simply meant that "keen on" is followed by the -ing form, regardless of the other words in the sentence or their position.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  9. Newbie
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Jan 2016
    • Posts: 13
    #9

    Re: Why ...ing form of verb?

    ahh great thank you again.

  10. jutfrank's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Mar 2014
    • Posts: 13,213
    #10

    Re: Why ...ing form of verb?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I'm keen on you buying me presents.
    I'm keen for you to buy me presents.

    He's keen on his brother playing for Liverpool.
    He's keen for his brother to play for Liverpool.

    We're keen on our daughter getting into Harvard.
    We're keen for our daughter to get into Harvard.
    Quote Originally Posted by Madeline2000 View Post
    Thank you, but as "for" is also a preposition, looking at your examples, it doesn't follow the same rule?
    You're right—it doesn't.

    I think this is because there's something special about for. Firstly, for, when it functions as complementizer, needs an overt subject. So, if we remove his brother from both clauses:

    He's keen on playing football.
    He's keen for to play football.


    Secondly, I think for can only work with a to-infinitive clause, and never an -ing clause.

    He's keen for his brother to play football.
    He's keen for his brother playing football.

    I might suggest one of the moderators moves this question into the Analysing Sentences forum, with the hope that one of our grammar experts might see it and give a more complete/accurate answer.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •