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  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    angry v.s song pronunciation

    When I listen to the words wrong and song, I do not hear any gggg sound .
    When I listen to the words angry and English, I do hear any gggg sound .
    But the four words have the same sound, am I right? or any explanation?

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    #2

    Re: angry v.s song pronunciation

    You're hearing correctly. In most accents, "wrong" and "song" end in /ŋ/. "Angry" and "English" contain that sound, but it's followed by /g/ (again, in most accents).
    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: angry v.s song pronunciation

    When I used this dictionary to listen to sing, I noticed that in the American pronunciation I could hear the g letter pronounced weakly.
    On the other hand, I could not hear it in the British pronunciation. Click image for larger version. 

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    #4

    Re: angry v.s song pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by ensan View Post
    When I used this dictionary to listen to sing, I noticed that in the American pronunciation I could hear the g letter pronounced weakly.
    Yes, the sample includes a /g/ sound. It may be an artifact of the recording and editing process, the speaker may have introduced it unconsciously, or the speaker may have an accent that includes it. If it's the latter, she was not a good choice for the job; most Americans don't pronounce the /g/ sound.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #5

    Re: angry v.s song pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by ensan View Post
    When I listen to the words wrong and song, I do not hear any gggg sound .One syllable.
    When I listen to the words angry and English, I do hear any gggg sound . Two syllables.
    But the four words have the same sound, am I right? No.or any explanation? Syllable count.
    Y

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    #6

    Re: angry v.s song pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by Yankee View Post
    When I listen to the words angry and English, I do hear any gggg sound . Two syllables.
    It has nothing to do with the number of syllables.

    In standard BrE, finger and linger have the /g/ sound; singer and bringer don't.
    Typoman - writer of rongs

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    #7

    Re: angry v.s song pronunciation

    It is the same in standard American English. Only a few people sound that final g.

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    #8

    Re: angry v.s song pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    It has nothing to do with the number of syllables. Well, it did in the original post. What I neglected to add is that when the second syllable (as in the original post), or any syllable, begins with a 'g' you would hear/vocalize the 'g' sound.

    In standard BrE, finger and linger have the /g/ sound; singer and bringer don't. The same in AmE.
    Thanks for helping me clarify.

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    #9

    Re: angry v.s song pronunciation

    There are regional differences, as well. When my friends from Long Island, New York, say where they're from, it sounds like Lawn Giland. A very hard G, indeed.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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