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  1. Senior Member
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    #21

    Re: Medical abbreviations BP, OE, JVP, CNS NAD

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    I'm fairly sure these aren't abbreviations, but acronyms. With acronyms, we usually pronounce the letters.

    I would make a semi-educated guess (based on watching 8 seasons of Doc Martin) that GP stands for General Practitioner and NHS for National Health System.

    Perhaps some of our members from the UK can confirm, but I believe your GP is the local doctor you normally visit first who then refers you on to specialists if needed.

    I don't know if the NHS number is a kind of individual patient ID number, or a number representing a particular medical facility, or what. Again, hopefully one of our UK members can elaborate, since this example seems to be based on the UK healthcare system.

    My sole source of information about healthcare in the UK comes from Doc Martin, so I'm notably under-informed about the subject.
    Side note: I just today found a source for season 9, so here's to binge-watching while self-quarantining!. Unfortunately, UK TV shows seem to have relatively few episodes per season, so that only give me a mere eight more episodes to enjoy.
    This discussion has been super helpful!!!! Unfortunately, I coudn't find CPS and Pr. The book doesn't give them. Attachment 3397 Blood pressure one hundred and thiry-eight over eighty-two. And IV is read as (the) fourth beta-blockers, I guess.

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    #22

    Re: Medical abbreviations BP, OE, JVP, CNS NAD

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    And IV is read as (the) fourth beta-blockers, I guess.
    Sorry, no. It stands for "intravenous" and follows the general rule: you pronounce the letter names.
    Last edited by GoesStation; 04-Apr-2020 at 15:24. Reason: Fix a punctuation mark.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Senior Member
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    #23

    Re: Medical abbreviations BP, OE, JVP, CNS NAD

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Sorry, no. It stands for "intravenous" and follows the general rule: you pronounce the letter names.
    Thank you. Was my post removed? Did I break the rules of this forum? There are 2 abbreviations which I cannot find.Will have to keep searching....
    CRS cardiorenal syndrome
    pR ?
    gwe?Click image for larger version. 

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    He hepatic encelophathy
    Last edited by Rachel Adams; 04-Apr-2020 at 17:41.

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    #24

    Re: Medical abbreviations BP, OE, JVP, CNS NAD

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    Was my post removed? Did I break the rules of this forum?
    Are you asking about the attachment? I don't think it was removed intentionally. It may have been a glitch of some kind. Try putting it up again.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #25

    Re: Medical abbreviations BP, OE, JVP, CNS NAD

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Are you asking about the attachment? I don't think it was removed intentionally. It may have been a glitch of some kind. Try putting it up again.
    Yes, I am. OK.

  6. Skrej's Avatar
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    #26

    Re: Medical abbreviations BP, OE, JVP, CNS NAD

    The terms you're asking about in post #23 involves a lot of medical terminology shorthand that someone who isn't a medical professional is unlikely to know. What you're asking about doesn't seem to be a English text as much as a medical transcription course. We've been able to puzzle out a few of them just because most of us have been to a doctor at some point in our lives and may have overheard some of the vocabulary. Either that, or we've watched enough medical drama on TV to recognize some of the lingo.

    PR would be 'pulse rate', because they normally take your pulse along with your blood pressure.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

  7. probus's Avatar
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    #27

    Re: Medical abbreviations BP, OE, JVP, CNS NAD

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    Thank you. Was my post removed? Did I break the rules of this forum? There are 2 abbreviations which I cannot find.Will have to keep searching....
    CRS cardiorenal syndrome
    pR ?
    gwe?Click image for larger version. 

Name:	GIN2.jpg 
Views:	9 
Size:	15.2 KB 
ID:	3399
    He hepatic encelophathy
    Encelophathy has to be garbled. Surely it must be encephalopathy, which according to its classical roots would mean "disease of the brain."

  8. Raymott's Avatar
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    #28

    Re: Medical abbreviations BP, OE, JVP, CNS NAD

    O/E sweaty no abnormalities in CRS (cardio-renal system). BP 138/82. PR
    110/min regular. He [was] give[n] analgesia, streptokinase, I/V beta
    blockers – continue[d]. Pain settle[d] and after two days beg[a]n [to]
    mobilize

    Basically, he's had an uncomplicated heart attack (myocardial infarct), and at the time of writing he was doing well. You'd have to know the situation to know whether the last sentence means "After two days, begin to mobilize", or what I've written.

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    #29

    Re: Medical abbreviations BP, OE, JVP, CNS NAD

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    O/E sweaty no abnormalities in CRS (cardio-renal system). BP 138/82. PR
    110/min regular. He [was] give[n] analgesia, streptokinase, I/V beta
    blockers – continue[d]. Pain settle[d] and after two days beg[a]n [to]
    mobilize

    Basically, he's had an uncomplicated heart attack (myocardial infarct), and at the time of writing he was doing well. You'd have to know the situation to know whether the last sentence means "After two days, begin to mobilize", or what I've written.
    Thank you so much. I would have never gussed that He gwe means ''he was given''. I thought that pR might stand for pulse rate but but when I googled it I found out it is written as PR not as pR.

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    #30

    Re: Medical abbreviations BP, OE, JVP, CNS NAD

    You're welcome. I would never have guessed that 'give' could be read as 'gwe'. You'll note that none of the i's are dotted, and the 'i' below, in "pain", is exactly the same as the 'i' in give.
    If you're studying medical (or any) transcription, you'll need to pick up a few tips on just reading other people's writing. Tip 1: If you're not sure what a letter is, see if you can find another one that looks the same which might be in an easier word.

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