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  1. Alex Rover's Avatar
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    #1

    Help with understanding

    Hi, everyone!
    I apologize if there are any errors in the description, my English is not perfect yet.
    I'm reading the book now and I have some problems with understanding:

    "Four circular dials on the four corners of the case lid rotated ninety degrees, indicating that the case was sealed tighter than a proverbial drum."

    I know that "proverbial" means well-known, something that everyone knows, but I still can't figure out what it means in the sentence. Could you give an explanation, or write a synonym?

    "If your friends had been a little more thorough, they would have seen straight through that false ID. Then all the red flags would've gone off: Quantico, VICAP, NSA, all the rest."

    I assumed that "red flags" means as a resistance movement, but given that "Quantico, VICAP, NSA" are government organizations that should not have any resistance, I don't know what the correct meaning is, and generally can't understand the sentence.
    I tried to find answers among the idioms, but I didn't find anything useful. Help me figure it out.
    Thank you!

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Help with understanding

    Welcome to the forum.

    Before we continue, please provide the source and author of the quote. Saying "I'm reading a book" isn't enough.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Alex Rover's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Help with understanding

    Hello! Oi. Thank you.
    Novelization by Keith R.A. DeCandido
    "Resident Evil: GENESIS"
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 05-Apr-2020 at 14:32.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Help with understanding

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Rover View Post
    Oi.
    What does that mean?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. Alex Rover's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Help with understanding

    An interjection that means unexpected.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Help with understanding

    It doesn't mean that. It's an impolite way of getting someone's attention. You might hear someone rudely shout "Oy! You! I want a word with you!" It can be used to express annoyance. "Oy! Don't do that! It's really annoying!"
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: Help with understanding

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Rover View Post
    An interjection that means unexpected.
    It doesn't.

    I know that "proverbial" means well-known, something that everyone knows,
    Not really. It means something like ''known from the proverb or saying".
    ..., indicating that the case was sealed tighter than a proverbial drum"
    ... indicating that it was sealed as tightly as possible, even more tightly than the skin of a drum.


    tight as a drum




    Taut or close-fitting; also, watertight.. For example, That baby's eaten so much that the skin on his belly is tight as a drum, or You needn't worry about leaks; this tent is tight as a drum. Originally this expression alluded to the skin of a drumhead, which is tightly stretched, and in the mid-1800s was transferred to other kinds of tautness. Later, however, it sometimes referred to a drum-shaped container, such as an oil drum, which had to be well sealed to prevent leaks, and the expression then signified “watertight.”

    https://www.dictionary.com/browse/tight-as-a-drum

    .
    Typoman - writer of rongs

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    #8

    Re: Help with understanding

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Rover View Post
    An interjection that means unexpected.
    English interjections are different in spelling and pronunciation from Russian ones. Russian "oi" in this context is close to English "oops."

    https://www.vidarholen.net/contents/interjections/
    Not a teacher

  9. Alex Rover's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Help with understanding

    emsr2d2, Alexey86
    Thanks! I will definitely take this into account.

    Piscean
    Thanks for the detailed answer, now I have begun to understand the meaning of comparison.

    __________________________________________________ __________________________
    After sitting with the dictionary, I began to think more that "red flags" means alarms (warnings) about what danger this person represents (the hero of the story) by getting information about him in the specified government organizations.
    Last edited by Alex Rover; 06-Apr-2020 at 08:17. Reason: My point of view on the question

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    #10

    Re: Help with understanding

    Quote Originally Posted by Alexey86 View Post
    English interjections are different in spelling and pronunciation from Russian ones. Russian "oi" in this context is close to English "oops."

    https://www.vidarholen.net/contents/interjections/
    We spell that interjection oy in American English. It's common among American Jews as an expression of surprise or concern. It's not unknown in the wider American community but not common.

    Americans don't use it in the British sense.
    I am not a teacher.

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