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Thread: Buster

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    #1

    Buster

    Hi teachers.

    Are my sentences natural with the word "buster"?

    1) I see ya, buster. (My friend and I agreed to meet and I saw him in the crowd.)
    2) Make with the beers, buster! (I went to a bar and said to the bartender.)

    I think they're British English and natural but a bit corny and rude. Am I right?

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    #2

    Re: Buster

    They're not typically heard in British English. In writing, capitalise 'Buster'.

    #2 is rude.

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    #3

    Re: Buster

    Quote Originally Posted by Silverobama View Post
    Hi teachers.

    Are my sentences natural with the word "buster"?

    1) I see ya, buster. (My friend and I agreed to meet and I saw him in the crowd.)
    2) Make with the beers, buster! (I went to a bar and said that to the bartender.)

    I think they're British English and natural but a bit corny and rude. Am I right?
    I imagine bartenders have heard worse. But what you and your friend say to each other is one thing. However, with somebody who is a relative stranger it's better to stick with what you know won't give offense.
    Not a professional teacher

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    #4

    Re: Buster

    Buster is belligerent. If you want to get in a fight, use it. If you don't, don't.
    Last edited by Charlie Bernstein; 06-Apr-2020 at 21:07.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    #5

    Re: Buster

    Get the beers in, mate.

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    #6

    Re: Buster

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Get the beers in, mate.
    Thanks a lot, Tdol. I am also interested to know the American English version of this sentence. So I asked on WR.

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    #7

    Re: Buster

    No, it's not the same in American English. We don't use "mate" as they do in Britain (and also, apparently, in Australia).

    But I would like a beer. Buy me a beer?
    Not a professional teacher

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    #8

    Re: Buster

    Quote Originally Posted by Silverobama View Post
    Thanks a lot, Tdol. I am also interested to know the American English version of this sentence. So I asked on WR.
    Sorry- I misread and posted what I would ask a friend if I wanted them to buy the beer. I would ask the bartender simply X beers, please, or, more likely, the brands- two pints of Stella and one Guinness, please.

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    #9

    Re: Buster

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Get the beers in, mate.
    I'd say that's a perfectly good sentence to say to one of your friends in the same group as you at the pub. Basically, you're saying it's their round! I wouldn't say it to the bartender though. "Get ... in" there means "buy".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  10. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Buster

    Quote Originally Posted by Silverobama View Post
    Thanks a lot, Tdol. I am also interested to know the American English version of this sentence. So I asked on WR.
    It's not American at all. We don't call people mate, and "Get the beers in" is meaningless. In from where? Why?

    If I were in a pub in England and heard someone say that, I'd just keep my mouth shut and watch to see what happens.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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