Page 2 of 2 First 1 2
Results 11 to 20 of 20

Thread: More than

  1. #11
    Luckysquirty is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Posts
    38

    Re: More than

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    NOT A TEACHER


    I commend you for wanting to parse sentences. It's a great pastime -- and educational, too.

    When you get extra time, you might want to look into the Reed-Kellogg diagramming system, which forces you to account for every single word in a sentence. A website entitled German - Latin - English.com will introduce you to it.

    An American poet named Gertrude Stein wrote: "I really do not know that anything has ever been more exciting than diagramming sentences."
    Thank you for information. Will check.

  2. #12
    PaulMatthews is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Great Britain
      • Current Location:
      • Great Britain
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    486

    Re: More than

    Quote Originally Posted by Luckysquirty View Post
    More than twenty eggs are in the basket.

    Could you kindly tell me what parts of speech are "more" and "than" in the sentence? Are they both adverbs? Are they joined and function as a compound adverb? Thank you.

    No, they are not adverbs.

    "More" is a determinative, and "than" is a preposition.

    I'd say that "more than twenty" is a constituent, a determinative phrase functioning as determiner in the noun phrase "more than twenty eggs", the subject of the sentence.

  3. #13
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    6,698

    Re: More than

    Quote Originally Posted by Luckysquirty View Post
    More than twenty eggs are in the basket.

    NOT A TEACHER

    Hi,

    I thought that you might like to know the opinion of my most admired grammarian, Dr. George Oliver Curme. Here are some ideas from his two-volume masterpiece A Grammar of the English Language (1931). He uses the names of the traditional parts of speech.


    Volume I, page 175

    1. He says that "more than" (as used in your kind of sentence) is an adverb. His examples: "More than one has found it" and "There is more than one reason."
    2. But he feels that "more" is a plural indefinite pronoun in "There are more than one."


    Volume II, page 59

    3. Dr. Curme says that the adverb "more than" = "not merely."
    4. He points out, however, that some grammarians consider the word "more" as a plural indefinite pronoun, so they use the plural verb: "More than one have found it so" instead of "More than one has found it so."
    a. He reminds us that "Of course, the plural is used when the words are separated" as in "More have found it so than just he."


    P.S. I hope that you continue to post questions in the diagramming sub-forum. When I first become a member some years back, there used to be a few members who regularly posted Reed-Kellogg diagrams. It was such fun! (I am too computer illiterate to do so.)

  4. #14
    Luckysquirty is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Posts
    38

    Re: More than

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    NOT A TEACHER

    Hi,

    I thought that you might like to know the opinion of my most admired grammarian, Dr. George Oliver Curme. Here are some ideas from his two-volume masterpiece A Grammar of the English Language (1931). He uses the names of the traditional parts of speech.


    Volume I, page 175

    1. He says that "more than" (as used in your kind of sentence) is an adverb. His examples: "More than one has found it" and "There is more than one reason."
    2. But he feels that "more" is a plural indefinite pronoun in "There are more than one."


    Volume II, page 59

    3. Dr. Curme says that the adverb "more than" = "not merely."
    4. He points out, however, that some grammarians consider the word "more" as a plural indefinite pronoun, so they use the plural verb: "More than one have found it so" instead of "More than one has found it so."
    a. He reminds us that "Of course, the plural is used when the words are separated" as in "More have found it so than just he."


    P.S. I hope that you continue to post questions in the diagramming sub-forum. When I first become a member some years back, there used to be a few members who regularly posted Reed-Kellogg diagrams. It was such fun! (I am too computer illiterate to do so.)
    Thanks for posting the information, TheParser. I could tell you are an open-minded, hard-working person. I will try to post examples that cause me to scratch my head. Thanks, again.
    Last edited by Luckysquirty; 17-Apr-2020 at 12:47.

  5. #15
    Luckysquirty is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Posts
    38

    Re: More than

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    Those two quotes illustrate part of the problem you face when dealing with categories of word classes, Luckysquirty. 'Determiner' was a class unknown when I first studied grammar seriously many decades ago (many was an adjective in those antediluvian days). 'Determiner' soon became generally accepted as a word class, as it still is by many people. However, for some time now, 'determiner' is used by some grammarians for a function, 'determinative' being used for the word class.

    Both jutfrank and Paul also mentioned 'preposition' in their posts. That is a word class that, for some grammarians, has many more members than it used to have. It now includes words that others still class as adverbs or conjunctions.
    Change and evolution. Each generation brings in a different set of people with newer ideas. What was once unpopular may now be popular. But, you have to go with he flow. I don't see any problem in learning "word classes" in a sentence. It's like knowing what is underneath the hood of a car, opposed to just putting the key in the ignition and driving off. At least, if the car breaks down, you are prepared to get it running again yourself. Thanks for info. Every little bit helps.

  6. #16
    PaulMatthews is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Great Britain
      • Current Location:
      • Great Britain
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    486

    Re: More than

    More than twenty eggs are in the basket.

    I don't think there's any doubt that "more" is the comparative form of the degree determinative "many", here taking a preposition phrase complement with the form "than" + quantifier (usually, as here, a numeral).

    The determinative phrase "more than twenty" then has a quantificational meaning in the underlined noun phrase.



  7. #17
    Tarheel's Avatar
    Tarheel is online now VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    22,579

    Re: More than

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    An American poet named Gertrude Stein wrote: "I really do not know that anything has ever been more exciting than diagramming sentences."
    Not knowing the context, it's hard to tell how sincere that was. It could have been meant sarcastically.
    Not a professional teacher

  8. #18
    Luckysquirty is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Posts
    38

    Re: More than

    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    Not knowing the context, it's hard to tell how sincere that was. It could have been meant sarcastically.
    Why would you challenge her sincerity? People could do the same to you too. If we play that game, we'd be left with a world looking like a dog constantly chasing its tail.

    She also quoted the following: "Everybody gets so much information all day long that they lose their common sense."

  9. #19
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    59,995

    Re: More than

    Quote Originally Posted by Luckysquirty View Post
    Thank you for the information. I will check it out.
    Luckysquirty, learners of English read this sub-section of the forum as well. Please make sure you write in complete sentences. We aim to ensure that learners see examples of grammatical English in complete sentences from native speakers.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  10. #20
    TheParser is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    6,698

    Re: More than

    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    Not knowing the context, it's hard to tell how sincere that was. It could have been meant sarcastically.

    NOT A TEACHER

    Hi,

    Excuse me for not including more details.

    This quotation appears in Sister Bernadette's Barking Dog (2006) by Kitty Burns Florey, who writes: "But Gertrude Stein always meant what she said, and so we have to believe that, for her, those sentences marched along their intersecting lines [she is referring to the lines used in Reed-Kellogg diagramming] like good little soldiers."

    Ms. Florey herself learned Reed-Kellogg from her sixth-grade teacher, Sister Bernadette, who told her students: "If you can't diagram it, don't write it."

Page 2 of 2 First 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •