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Thread: 18-25 or 60+

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    #1

    18-25 or 60+

    Hello.

    How do you pronounce the written description of age groups "18-25 or 60+" as "eighteen, twenty-five or sixty plus"? It is from the book Flash on English for Tourism by Patricia Karuso..
    Last edited by Rachel Adams; 04-May-2020 at 13:57.

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    #2

    Re: 18 25 60+

    Eighteen to twenty-five
    Sixty plus

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    #3

    Re: 18 25 60+

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Eighteen to twenty-five
    Sixty plus
    It is unnecesary to pronounce "or" which they wrote. Right?

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    #4

    Re: 18 25 60+

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    It is unnecesary to pronounce "or" which they wrote. Right?
    You should say "or." Dave didn't realize you wanted the entire phrase.

    I'd write it "eighteen-to-twenty-five or sixty-plus."
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    #5

    Re: 18 25 60+

    To make it clearer, I'd write "eighteen to twenty-five, or sixty-plus". Without the comma before "or", it could be taken to mean "eighteen to twenty-five or eighteen to sixty-plus". I admit it's unlikely but it's good to be clear.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: 18-25 or 60+

    I've amended your thread title to make it more relevant to your question.

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    #7

    Re: 18 25 60+

    You could also say over sixty.

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    #8

    Re: 18 25 60+

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    You could also say over sixty.
    Although some pedant will tell you that refers to people who are 61 or older.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #9

    Re: 18 25 60+

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Although some pedant will tell you that refers to people who are 61 or older.
    Which it may. "Sixty or above" or "sixty plus" avoid any uncertainty.
    I am not a teacher.

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