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    #1

    calling someone "a silver spoon"?

    Of course I know the phrase "she was born with a silver spoon in her mouth",
    would it be possible to say "she is a silver spoon" in the same context?

    In my understanding. a silver spoon here is a symbol of her wealthy circumstances, then she can never be called a silver spoon herself.
    I saw someone in another BBS said calling someone "a silver spoon" is OK in US, especially among the people who have grown with TV show "Silver Spoons" in 80's. Is that true?
    I can imagine how it is easy to guess what it means if only you know original expression "she was born with.......", but still sounds odd to say "she is a silver spoon", ---- it's not even "a silverspooner" there---- and seems it shouldn't be reasonablly recommended for English leaners. Have you heard, seen or used this before?


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    #2

    Re: calling someone "a silver spoon"?

    I've definitely never heard it used in England. If I wanted to say that someone was born rich I'd call them a "toff" (though only if they're English), but it's derogatory.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: calling someone "a silver spoon"?

    Quote Originally Posted by fussychick View Post
    Of course I know the phrase "she was born with a silver spoon in her mouth",
    would it be possible to say "she is a silver spoon" in the same context?

    In my understanding. a silver spoon here is a symbol of her wealthy circumstances, then she can never be called a silver spoon herself.
    I saw someone in another BBS said calling someone "a silver spoon" is OK in US, especially among the people who have grown with TV show "Silver Spoons" in 80's. Is that true?
    I can imagine how it is easy to guess what it means if only you know original expression "she was born with.......", but still sounds odd to say "she is a silver spoon", ---- it's not even "a silverspooner" there---- and seems it shouldn't be reasonablly recommended for English leaners. Have you heard, seen or used this before?
    A silver spoon is symbol of wealth, not the wealthy person. I don't think that is correct usage.

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    #4

    Re: calling someone "a silver spoon"?

    I could see using it as an adjective,

    "He's a silver-spoon, frat-boy brat."

    I don't know if I've ever heard that, (It's probably the only name I haven't been called) but if I said it, everyone would know exactly what I meant.


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    #5

    Re: calling someone "a silver spoon"?

    Quote Originally Posted by RobbieCook View Post
    I've definitely never heard it used in England. If I wanted to say that someone was born rich I'd call them a "toff" (though only if they're English), but it's derogatory.
    Thanks Robbie Cook, toff is not so familiar actually. I hope I don't have to use that new vocab if it's offensive, so what would you say when you want to be neutral or maybe polite?


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    #6

    Re: calling someone "a silver spoon"?

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    A silver spoon is symbol of wealth, not the wealthy person. I don't think that is correct usage.
    I thought that's the universal idea then refering someone a silver spoon was a bit far-fetched to me. Thank you MikeNewYork!


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    #7

    Re: calling someone "a silver spoon"?

    Quote Originally Posted by mykwyner View Post
    I could see using it as an adjective,

    "He's a silver-spoon, frat-boy brat."

    I don't know if I've ever heard that, (It's probably the only name I haven't been called) but if I said it, everyone would know exactly what I meant.
    Thanks mykwyner! That explains, so if you heard someone saying only "he is a siver spoon." would you automatically add noun like "boy" "baby"....in your mind and complete the sentence? Do you think it implies negative feelings by the way?

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: calling someone "a silver spoon"?

    Quote Originally Posted by fussychick View Post
    I thought that's the universal idea then refering someone a silver spoon was a bit far-fetched to me. Thank you MikeNewYork!
    You're welcome.

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