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  1. #1
    nicolas Guest

    Ride by, ride past and stop by

    Dear All,

    It's me, Nicolas.
    Happy Chinese New Year! :D

    I read a sentence as below:
    The hunters came riding by/past on their horses.

    Is ride by like stop by?
    What's the difference between them?
    And are ride by and ride past the same?

    Thanks :D

  2. #2
    RonBee's Avatar
    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Ride by and stop by are not the same. To stop by is to visit, albeit briefly. If you were to stop by some place you would pay a brief visit. You would stay there a short while and then move on.

    :)

    To ride by and to ride past are the same.

    :)

  3. #3
    nicolas Guest
    Dear RonBee,

    Thanks! :D

    :wink:
    But What doest ride by mean?
    Are they a phrase?

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    If you go past something without stopping, you can use 'by' with any verb of motion, so the riders passed the place mentioned.

  5. #5
    RonBee's Avatar
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    What Tdol said.

    :wink:

    (Say: "Is it a phrase.")

    :)

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    If you mean a phrasal verb, Nicolas, I'd say no as they both keep their dictionary definitions.

  7. #7
    nicolas Guest
    Dear RonBee and tdol,

    Really, really thank you! :D

    Happy Chinese New Year! :D

  8. #8
    RonBee's Avatar
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    You're quite welcome. When did the Chinese New Year start? Also, where is it in the cycle? (Is it the Year of the Dragon, for example?)

    :D

  9. #9
    nicolas Guest
    Dear RonBee,

    :D
    The Chinese New Year is on 22 January.
    And most Chinese in Taiwan will have holidays during 21 - 27.

    It's the Year of Monkey.

    :wink:
    When did the Chinese New Year start?
    ^^!!
    There are many versions, but I think it started in about 200(?) B.C.
    A emperor held a ceremony to celebrate an abundant harvest.

    It's hard for me to explain that, my English isn't good enough.

    Happy Chinese New Year :D

  10. #10
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nicolas
    Dear RonBee,

    :D
    The Chinese New Year is on 22 January.
    And most Chinese in Taiwan will have holidays during 21 - 27.

    It's the Year of Monkey.

    :wink:
    When did the Chinese New Year start?
    ^^!!
    There are many versions, but I think it started in about 200(?) B.C.
    A emperor held a ceremony to celebrate an abundant harvest.

    It's hard for me to explain that, my English isn't good enough.

    Happy Chinese New Year :D
    Thanks! :D

    (I should have said "When does the Chinese New Year start?" but I was thinking it had already started.)

    The Chinese use a lunar calendar, so the new year starts on a different date every year (according to the Western calendar). Right?

    :)

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