Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last
Results 1 to 10 of 23

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. Key Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Georgia
      • Current Location:
      • Georgia

    • Join Date: Nov 2018
    • Posts: 1,887
    #1

    The tide comes in

    Hello.

    What is the opposite of ''The tide comes in'', ''The tide is out'', ''The tide is back'' and ''back out?'' What verb do you use in such context?

  2. Tarheel's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jun 2014
    • Posts: 20,000
    #2

    Re: The tide comes in

    1. The tide comes in.
    2. The tide goes out.

    It's possible to use the same verb for both, thus:

    The tide rolls in; the tide rolls out.
    Not a professional teacher

  3. Key Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Georgia
      • Current Location:
      • Georgia

    • Join Date: Nov 2018
    • Posts: 1,887
    #3

    Re: The tide comes in

    Quote Originally Posted by Tarheel View Post
    1. The tide comes in.
    2. The tide goes out.

    It's possible to use the same verb for both, thus:

    The tide rolls in; the tide rolls out.
    ''The tide is back out'' or ''the tide is back'' means it has come in. Right?

  4. VIP Member
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Europe
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 16,820
    #4

    Re: The tide comes in

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    ''The tide is back out'' or ''the tide is back'' means it has come in. Right?
    No.

    Where have you seen/heard these?
    Typoman - writer of rongs

  5. Key Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Georgia
      • Current Location:
      • Georgia

    • Join Date: Nov 2018
    • Posts: 1,887
    #5

    Re: The tide comes in

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    No.

    Where have you seen/heard these?
    In the movie The Woman in Black. "What time is the tide back out"? And "It will be out again by 17:00."

  6. VIP Member
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Europe
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 16,820
    #6

    Re: The tide comes in

    They clearly mean when the tide is out (again). it may be coming in or going out at the moment of speaking.
    Last edited by GoesStation; 23-May-2020 at 13:15. Reason: typo
    Typoman - writer of rongs

  7. Senior Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Sep 2013
    • Posts: 1,206
    #7

    Re: The tide comes in

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    Hello.

    What is the opposite of ''The tide comes in'', ''The tide is out'', ''The tide is back'' and ''back out?'' What verb do you use in such context?
    "The tide recedes" is frequently used.

  8. VIP Member
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Europe
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 16,820
    #8

    Re: The tide comes in

    Quote Originally Posted by Yankee View Post
    "The tide recedes" is frequently used.
    In quite a few years of dealing with tides in southern England I did not come across that.
    Typoman - writer of rongs

  9. Moderator
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 18,721
    #9

    Re: The tide comes in

    Quote Originally Posted by Yankee View Post
    "The tide recedes" is frequently used.
    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    In quite a few years of dealing with tides in southern England I did not come across that.
    It sounds odd to my American ears, too.
    I am not a teacher.

  10. Senior Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Sep 2013
    • Posts: 1,206
    #10

    Re: The tide comes in

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    It sounds odd to my American ears, too.

    As a frequent visitor to the Jersey shore it's not unusual, at least on the east coast. Suggest you Google it.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •