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    #1

    If you went to the club you wouldn't be able to return on time. You friend would have

    1) If you go to the club you won't be able to return on time. You friend will have left by the time you reach home.

    2) If you went to the club you wouldn't be able to return on time. You friend would have left by the time you reached home.


    Please check my sentences.

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    #2

    Re: If you went to the club you wouldn't be able to return on time. You friend would

    There's a comma missing in the first half of both. "on time" for what?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: If you went to the club you wouldn't be able to return on time. You friend would

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    You friend will have left by the time you reach home.
    The underlined words contain an error.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #4

    Re: If you went to the club you wouldn't be able to return on time. You friend would

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    There's a comma missing in the first half of both. "on time" for what?
    1) If you go to the club to have a party, you won't be able to return on time. Your friend will have left by the time you reach home.

    2) If you went to the club, you wouldn't be able to return on time. Your friend would have left by the time you reached home.

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    #5

    Re: If you went to the club you wouldn't be able to return on time. You friend would

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    1) If you go to the club to have a party, you won't be able to return on time. Your friend will have left by the time you reach home.

    2) If you went to the club, you wouldn't be able to return on time. Your friend would have left by the time you reached home.
    The tenses are correct. You haven't used excess words. Well done.

    "Have a party" isn't used quite right in sentence one.
    I am not a teacher.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: If you went to the club you wouldn't be able to return on time. You friend would

    I'll ask again - "on time" for what? I have a sneaking suspicion you might mean "in time".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: If you went to the club you wouldn't be able to return on time. You friend would

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I'll ask again - "on time" for what? I have a sneaking suspicion you might mean "in time".
    By "On time" I mean within the time the friend has to stay there. ( Is my sentence correct?) Or before he leaves.

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    #8

    Re: If you went to the club you wouldn't be able to return on time. You friend would

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    The tenses are correct. You haven't used excess words. Well done.

    "Have a party" isn't used quite right in sentence one.
    Could you please tell me the correct way to use it?

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    #9

    Re: If you went to the club you wouldn't be able to return on time. You friend would

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    "Have a party" isn't used quite right in sentence one.
    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    Could you please tell me the correct way to use it?
    You might say "Let's have a party!" if you want to suggest throwing a party. In your sentence it sounds like you're talking about attending one. In that case, you might say If you go to the club for/to attend the party, you won't be able to return in time. "To attend" sounds quite formal; "for" is fine for most contexts.

    I changed an article, too. Can you see why?
    I am not a teacher.

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    #10

    Re: If you went to the club you wouldn't be able to return on time. You friend would

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    By "On time" I mean within the time the friend has to stay there no full stop here or before he leaves. (Is my sentence correct?)
    What do you mean by "the time my friend has to stay there"? Why is your friend obliged to stay there at all?

    If you have been given a deadline by which you have to return and you get back before that time, you're "on time". If you miss the deadline, you're late.
    If you want to get somewhere with enough time to spare to do something, you're "in time".

    So - if you've been told that you must get back to the club by 10pm and you get back by (or before) 10pm, you're on time. If your friend is going to leave at 10pm and you get back at 9.55pm, then you got back in time to see him.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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