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    #11

    Re: The classical Latin word is from Greek

    Quote Originally Posted by kadioguy View Post
    grammar (n.)

    late 14c., "Latin grammar, rules of Latin," from Old French gramaire "grammar; learning," especially Latin and philology, also "(magic) incantation, spells, mumbo-jumbo" (12c., Modern French grammaire), an "irregular semi-popular adoption" [OED] of Latin grammatica "grammar, philology," perhaps via an unrecorded Medieval Latin form *grammaria. The classical Latin word is from Greek grammatike (tekhnē) "(art) of letters," referring both to philology and to literature in the broadest sense, fem. of grammatikos (adj.) "pertaining to or versed in letters or learning," from gramma "letter" (see -gram). An Old English gloss of it was stæfcræft (see staff (n.)).
    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    The point is that when we study it, it is very much alive, and present as an object of study. We say that the Latin word for 'grammar' is (not was) 'grammatike'. It's no different for Old English.
    1. Did you mean to say We say that the Latin word for 'grammar' is (not was) from (Greek) 'grammatike'?

    2. Do you mean this?

    When we study the Latin word for 'grammar', it is very much alive, and present as an object of study, so we use "is (not was)". And we don't focus on its Old English form at this moment, so we can simply use "was", which means stæfcræft existed in the past - we don't study it for now.
    Last edited by kadioguy; 28-May-2020 at 17:01.
    I am not a teacher. If there is anything ungrammatical in my post, please correct it. I am grateful for your help.

  2. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #12

    Re: The classical Latin word is from Greek

    1. No. I was translating.

    2. Very loosely, yes.

    Remember what I've said before about using present and past tenses. If the writer uses a present tense, he imagines the thing as present, and if he uses the past tense, he imagines it as past. In this case, the writer wanted to focus on the use of the the Old English gloss as a thing of the past. It's simple. You don't have to worry about why.

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    #13

    Re: The classical Latin word is from Greek

    Thank you, jutfrank.

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    Remember what I've said before about using present and past tenses.
    I assume that present and past tenses means present tense and past tense, rather than present tenses and past tenses.

    Am I right in thinking this?

    (Rethink: maybe it means present tenses and past tenses. )

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    If the writer uses a present tense, he imagines the thing as present, and if he uses the past tense, he imagines it as past.
    I can't tell why
    If the writer uses a present tense, but if he uses the past tense. Could you help me?
    Last edited by kadioguy; 29-May-2020 at 04:25. Reason: added contents
    I am not a teacher. If there is anything ungrammatical in my post, please correct it. I am grateful for your help.

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    #14

    Re: The classical Latin word is from Greek

    Quote Originally Posted by kadioguy View Post
    present and past tenses

    (Rethink: maybe it means present tenses and past tenses.)
    I think that my understanding could be accurate. What do you think?

    Quote Originally Posted by kadioguy View Post
    I can't tell why If the writer uses a present tense, but if he uses the past tense. Could you help me?


    GoesStation:

    I was thinking of phrases in general. I'd have used the definite article if I'd been thinking of the phrase such as.

    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/t...=1#post1599437

    -----
    Can I apply this reply to my question here?

    (In general) If the writer uses a present tense, he imagines the thing as present, and (in a specific case) if he uses the past tense, he imagines it as past.
    I am not a teacher. If there is anything ungrammatical in my post, please correct it. I am grateful for your help.

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    #15

    Re: The classical Latin word is from Greek

    Quote Originally Posted by kadioguy View Post
    (Rethink: maybe it means present tenses and past tenses.)
    Quote Originally Posted by kadioguy View Post
    GoesStation:

    I was thinking of phrases in general. I'd have used the definite article if I'd been thinking of the phrase such as.

    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/t...=1#post1599437

    -----
    Can I apply this reply to my question here?

    (In general) If the writer uses a present tense, he imagines the thing as present, and (in a specific case) if he uses the past tense, he imagines it as past.
    I have tried my best to think about the two questions. Could someone please help me?
    I am not a teacher. If there is anything ungrammatical in my post, please correct it. I am grateful for your help.

  6. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #16

    Re: The classical Latin word is from Greek

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    If the writer uses a present tense, he imagines the thing as present, and if he uses a past tense, he imagines it as past.
    There. Correction.

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    #17

    Re: The classical Latin word is from Greek

    Quote Originally Posted by kadioguy View Post
    I assume that present and past tenses means present tense and past tense, rather than present tenses and past tenses.

    (Rethink: maybe it means present tenses and past tenses. )
    Thank you very much, jutfrank.

    If you don't mind, could you please tell me about this one?

    Having a guide by a teacher or a experienced native speaker is blissful.
    I am not a teacher. If there is anything ungrammatical in my post, please correct it. I am grateful for your help.

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    #18

    Re: The classical Latin word is from Greek

    Quote Originally Posted by kadioguy View Post
    Having a guide by a teacher or a experienced native speaker is blissful.
    Okay, how could I deny you such bliss?

    What do you want to know? Ask again because I've lost the thread of what you're thinking.

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    #19

    Re: The classical Latin word is from Greek

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    Remember what I've said before about using present and past tenses.


    1.
    Does the blue part mean present (tenses) and past tenses (rather than present tense and past tense)?

    2.
    I mean, present tenses and past tenses can be simplified as present and past tenses, and present tense and past tense can be simplified as present and past tense.

    Am I right?
    I am not a teacher. If there is anything ungrammatical in my post, please correct it. I am grateful for your help.

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    #20

    Re: The classical Latin word is from Greek

    1. Yes.

    2. Yes.

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