Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Plafond/shade

  1. Key Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Georgia
      • Current Location:
      • Georgia

    • Join Date: Nov 2018
    • Posts: 1,665
    #1

    Plafond/shade

    Hello.

    What do you call this object in the picture? A Russian-English dictionary says it is a 'plafond' or 'shade'. But I coudn't find it in an English disctionary with this meaning.Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Без названия (1).jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	4.7 KB 
ID:	3526

  2. Moderator
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 30,044
    #2

    Re: Plafond/shade

    It's a lampshade.

    I've only ever been aware of 'plafond' being the French word for 'ceiling', but it's apparently used as an English word. [link]
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 28-May-2020 at 11:51.

  3. Key Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Georgia
      • Current Location:
      • Georgia

    • Join Date: Nov 2018
    • Posts: 1,665
    #3

    Re: Plafond/shade

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    It's a lampshade.

    I've only ever been aware of 'plafond' being the French word for 'ceiling', but it's apparently used as an English word. [link]
    It is strange that the Russian dictionary gives 'plafond' as the synonym of the word 'lampshade'. Do you call all of them 'lampshade' in English?Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Screenshot_2020-05-28-15-03-39-813_com.google.android.googlequicksearchbox.jpg 
Views:	8 
Size:	44.5 KB 
ID:	3527

  4. VIP Member
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Europe
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 16,656
    #4

    Re: Plafond/shade

    I do.
    Typoman - writer of rongs

  5. Moderator
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 18,353
    #5

    Re: Plafond/shade

    They're all lampshades. The lampshade in your original post is a globe-type lampshade.
    I am not a teacher.

  6. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Other
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 6,073
    #6

    Re: Plafond/shade

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    It's a lampshade.

    I've only ever been aware of 'plafond' being the French word for 'ceiling', but it's apparently used as an English word. [link]
    I'd never heard it. Turns out the Sistine Chapel has a famous one.

    I used to know an Iranian who was learning English. He called a rump a podex and didn't understand why no on knew what he was talking about. But like plafond, it's in the dictionary. For some reason.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 28-May-2020 at 13:53. Reason: fixing typo
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  7. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Other
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 6,073
    #7

    Re: Plafond/shade

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    It is strange that the Russian dictionary gives 'plafond' as the synonym of the word 'lampshade'. Do you call all of them 'lampshade' in English?
    That's a picture of lamps with lampshades. The shades, or lampshades, cover the lightbulbs to diffuse (scatter) the light.
    Last edited by Charlie Bernstein; 28-May-2020 at 13:53.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  8. Moderator
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 30,044
    #8

    Re: Plafond/shade

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    It is strange that the Russian dictionary gives 'plafond' as the synonym of the word 'lampshade'. Do you call all of these 'lampshades' in English?Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Screenshot_2020-05-28-15-03-39-813_com.google.android.googlequicksearchbox.jpg 
Views:	8 
Size:	44.5 KB 
ID:	3527
    Yes, and nearly all the pictures of plafonds in Google images have French captions.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 28-May-2020 at 13:57.

  9. jutfrank's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Mar 2014
    • Posts: 12,060
    #9

    Re: Plafond/shade

    If it's meant to hang from the ceiling, which the word plafond suggests it is, I'd call it a lightshade, not a lampshade.

    I use lampshade for lamps only. The thing that hangs from the ceiling I wouldn't call a lamp—it's a light.

  10. Moderator
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 18,353
    #10

    Re: Plafond/shade

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    If it's meant to hang from the ceiling, which the word plafond suggests it is, I'd call it a lightshade, not a lampshade.

    I use lampshade for lamps only. The thing that hangs from the ceiling I wouldn't call a lamp—it's a light.
    I missed that. The thing in post #1 is a ceiling globe in American lighting terminology.
    I am not a teacher.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •