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  1. #1
    Matt is offline Newbie
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    do you want to climb up a hill?

    Hi everyone,

    I hope you are doing well.

    In the case of a mother saying to her two-year-old child 'do you want to climb up a hill?' and at the same time pointing to the chair on which the child will sit down to have lunch, which figure of speech does the mother use?

    I would say that this is a metaphor, because she refers to an objects by means of another 'more abstract' thing, but I'm not sure.

    Thanks for your help and have a good day.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 28-May-2020 at 23:26. Reason: Removed unnecessary line breaks

  2. #2
    Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    Charlie Bernstein is offline VIP Member
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    Re: do you want to climb up a hill?

    Welcome, Matt!

    We usually say "climb a hill," not "climb up a hill."

    That's not how we use metaphor. I'd call that making a game or turning it into a game. We make games out of tasks to make the tasks more appealing to kids. We turn tasks into games to make them fun.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  3. #3
    jutfrank's Avatar
    jutfrank is offline VIP Member
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    Re: do you want to climb up a hill?

    Absolutely, yes, it is a metaphor, in a very basic sense.

    However, it's not accurate to say that the reference is to a 'more abstract thing'. It doesn't help to think of a hill as more abstract than a high chair.

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