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  1. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #11

    Re: Keep/Put it over there.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashraful Haque View Post
    This is very confusing. I hope I'm not being dumb. I don't understand what 'if you don't want it to stay where you are' mean.
    I'm very confused. How do I decide whether to use leave, keep and put?
    Looking at your dictionary again might help you.

    Keep means store, stash, secure. The place we keep things is where they go no one is using them: I'm looking for the weights. Where do you keep them?

    Put means place, deposit, lay. It's a simple instruction on what to do with it: Put the weights on the floor. I'll put them on their rack later. The rack is where we keep them.

    Leave
    means put and walk away: Leave the weights on the table when you're ready to go home. Tomorrow, I'll put them on the rack where we keep them.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #12

    Re: Keep/Put it over there.

    Also, "leave something ..." can have two meanings. It can mean "put something somewhere and then walk away without touching it again" or simply "Don't touch it".

    Peter - Your water bottle is by the exercise bike. Do you want me to get it for you?
    Helen - No, thanks. Leave it where it is. I'll pick it up later.

    Peter - I found your water bottle. Here you go. (Said as Peter offers the bottle to Helen)
    Helen - Thanks, but please leave it over there by my shoes.

    In the first dialogue, Helen is asking Peter not to touch it. She wants him to leave it where it (already) is.
    In the second dialogue, it's clearly in Peter's hand but Helen doesn't want it right now so she asks him to take the bottle over to where her shoes are and put it down, then leave it there.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #13

    Re: Keep/Put it over there.

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    Looking at your dictionary again might help you.

    Keep means store, stash, secure. The place we keep things is where they go no one is using them: I'm looking for the weights. Where do you keep them?

    Put means place, deposit, lay. It's a simple instruction on what to do with it: Put the weights on the floor. I'll put them on their rack later. The rack is where we keep them.

    Leave
    means put and walk away: Leave the weights on the table when you're ready to go home. Tomorrow, I'll put them on the rack where we keep them.
    According to this, in my context (put it over there) 'keep' isn't correct/natural. It should be either 'put' or 'leave.' But can I use 'leave' even if the person isn't actually leaving? Would using 'leave' actually tell him to leave after leaving it in the corner?

    I came across another sentence- 'I've put the luggage in the room.' It's from a travel English learning video but for some reason it sounds kind of awkward to me.

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    #14

    Re: Keep/Put it over there.

    "Leave it over there" does not mean "put it down there and go away". Leave refers to the thing the person has possession of, not to the person.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashraful Haque View Post
    I came across another sentence: 'I've put the luggage in the room.' It's from a travel English learning video but for some reason it sounds kind of awkward to me.
    That's perfectly natural.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #15

    Re: Keep/Put it over there.

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    "Leave it over there" does not mean "put it down there and go away". Leave refers to the thing the person has possession of, not to the person.
    I understand that part but one of the replies above says leave= "put something somewhere and then walk away without touching it again."

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    #16

    Re: Keep/Put it over there.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashraful Haque View Post
    I understand that part but one of the replies above says leave= "put something somewhere and then walk away from it without touching it again."
    Is it clearer with my addition?
    I am not a teacher.

  7. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #17

    Re: Keep/Put it over there.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashraful Haque View Post
    I understand that part but one of the replies above says leave= "put something somewhere and then walk away without touching it again."
    Yes, exactly.

    Now I have to scroll up to see who said it.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  8. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #18

    Re: Keep/Put it over there.

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Is it clearer with my addition?
    I think so. Let's see is Ashraful agrees.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    #19

    Re: Keep/Put it over there.

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Is it clearer with my addition?
    I see think I get it. But from a different perspective. If I'm the one who borrowed the weights. Do both 'put' and 'leave' work here as well:
    "Where should I put/leave it?"

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    #20

    Re: Keep/Put it over there.

    If you borrowed the weights, you might say "I've finished with these. Where should I put them?" or "I've finished with these. Where should I leave them?" It really doesn't matter.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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