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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    I turned on the water faucet so that the water flowed smoothly.

    https://www.chegg.com/homework-help/...eases-q9102089


    1 - I turned on the water faucet so that the water flowed smoothly.
    2 - I turned on the water faucet so that the water would flow smoothly.
    3 - I turned on the water faucet so that the water could flow smoothly.

    I guess the three sentences above are grammatical with a slight difference. Could you explain the difference between them?

  2. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: I turned on the water faucet so that the water flowed smoothly.

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    https://www.chegg.com/homework-help/...eases-q9102089


    1 - I turned on the water faucet so that the water flowed smoothly. Good. It means that after your turned it on, it flowed smoothly.

    2 - I turned on the water faucet so that the water would flow smoothly. Good, it means you turned it on to allow it to flow smoothy. Which, of course, it did.

    3 - I turned on the water faucet so that the water could flow smoothly. Not as good. This one might make a little bit of sense, but not as much as the others.

    I guess the three sentences above are grammatical with a slight difference. Could you explain the difference between them?
    Yes, they're grammatical.

    Using smoothly doesn't help any of them. We turn on faucets so that the water flows, period. I'd delete smoothly. But it's your choice.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  3. Moderator
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    #3

    Re: I turned on the water faucet so that the water flowed smoothly.

    I open faucets, but turn on is okay.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: I turned on the water faucet so that the water flowed smoothly.

    BrE uses only "turn on the tap" and "turn off the tap". Plumbers might use "open" and "close" but non-technical people don't.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: I turned on the water faucet so that the water flowed smoothly.

    I've been thinking about this. I think I also turn on the tap and maybe turn on the water. I might even turn on the faucet from time to time. I used to call the thing the water comes out of the spigot, but I think I've mostly given up the habit.
    I am not a teacher.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: I turned on the water faucet so that the water flowed smoothly.

    I've heard before that AmE speakers use both "faucet" and "tap". BrE speakers never use "faucet".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: I turned on the water faucet so that the water flowed smoothly.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I've heard before that AmE speakers use both "faucet" and "tap". BrE speakers never use "faucet".
    How about "spigot"?
    I am not a teacher.

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    #8

    Re: I turned on the water faucet so that the water flowed smoothly.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I've heard before that AmE speakers use both "faucet" and "tap". BrE speakers never use "faucet".
    1. Yes.
    2. I didn't know that.

    Ever since I joined this forum I've been learning about British English and the differences between the two varieties (British and American English). The learning never stops.
    Not a professional teacher

  9. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: I turned on the water faucet so that the water flowed smoothly.

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    How about "spigot"?
    No. I was under the impression that a spigot was part of a tap, but then I looked it up and it says "American - a tap".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #10

    Re: I turned on the water faucet so that the water flowed smoothly.

    You remember my plumber, Lee King-Fawcett, don't you? He's taken on two apprentices – Rod Draynes and Lou Flushing.

    They all say 'Turn the tap on/off'.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 28-May-2020 at 23:27.

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