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    #1

    The classical Latin word is from Greek

    grammar (n.)

    late 14c., "Latin grammar, rules of Latin," from Old French gramaire "grammar; learning," especially Latin and philology, also "(magic) incantation, spells, mumbo-jumbo" (12c., Modern French grammaire), an "irregular semi-popular adoption" [OED] of Latin grammatica "grammar, philology," perhaps via an unrecorded Medieval Latin form *grammaria. The classical Latin word is from Greek grammatike (tekhnē) "(art) of letters," referring both to philology and to literature in the broadest sense, fem. of grammatikos (adj.) "pertaining to or versed in letters or learning," from gramma "letter" (see -gram). An Old English gloss of it was stæfcræft (see staff (n.)).

    https://www.etymonline.com/word/grammar
    ----------

    The blue part is used in the present tense, while the red part is used in the past tense. I wonder why.

    Is the writer suggesting that this
    classical Latin word still exists?
    I am not a teacher. If there is anything ungrammatical in my post, please correct it. I am grateful for your help.

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    #2

    Re: The classical Latin word is from Greek

    Quote Originally Posted by kadioguy View Post
    Is the writer suggesting that this classical Latin word still exists?
    Well, I found this in Wikipedia:

    Latin is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. [...] It is the official language in the Holy See (Vatican City).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin
    ---------

    So yes, this word still exists.
    I am not a teacher. If there is anything ungrammatical in my post, please correct it. I am grateful for your help.

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    #3

    Re: The classical Latin word is from Greek

    The blue part is about the present, right? It talks about the derivation of the word, as it exists now.

    The red part is about the past.

    It's hard to see what you can't understand about this. Why would you think that Latin doesn't exist?

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    #4

    Re: The classical Latin word is from Greek

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    The blue part is about the present, right? It talks about the derivation of the word, as it exists now.
    I thought that "The classical Latin word" referred to "Latin grammatica", and this Latin word was created and used in the past, so it should have been The classical Latin word was from Greek.

    Do you mean that "The classical Latin word" refers to this English word "grammar", which still exists now?

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    Why would you think that Latin doesn't exist?
    I thought that Latin, as well as Old English, has been "dead".
    I am not a teacher. If there is anything ungrammatical in my post, please correct it. I am grateful for your help.

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    #5

    Re: The classical Latin word is from Greek

    Quote Originally Posted by kadioguy View Post
    I thought that Latin, as well as Old English, has been was "dead".
    It's a dead language in the sense that nobody in the world has spoken it as their mother tongue for centuries. But there are still millions of people who know it well enough to claim some level of fluency. Old English is known by only a few scholars. The number of people who could claim fluency in it could probably fit into a small lecture hall.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #6

    Re: The classical Latin word is from Greek

    Quote Originally Posted by kadioguy View Post
    I thought that Latin, as well as Old English, has been "dead".
    Thank you for the correction, GoesStation. The red part should have been in line with the blue part in the tense.
    I am not a teacher. If there is anything ungrammatical in my post, please correct it. I am grateful for your help.

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    #7

    Re: The classical Latin word is from Greek

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    The blue part is about the present, right? It talks about the derivation of the word, as it exists now.

    The red part is about the past.
    Quote Originally Posted by kadioguy View Post
    Do you mean that "The classical Latin word" refers to this English word "grammar", which still exists now?
    Am I right in thinking this?

    -----------
    And the red part:

    An Old English gloss of it was stæfcræft (see staff(n.))

    I think it means that people used stæfcræft to mean grammar in the Old English times. So it is about the past and "was" is used.

    Do I understand it correctly?
    I am not a teacher. If there is anything ungrammatical in my post, please correct it. I am grateful for your help.

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    #8

    Re: The classical Latin word is from Greek

    Quote Originally Posted by kadioguy View Post
    Do you mean that "The classical Latin word" refers to this English word "grammar", which still exists now?
    Quote Originally Posted by kadioguy View Post
    An Old English gloss of it was stæfcræft (see staff(n.))

    I think it means that people used stæfcræft to mean grammar in the Old English times. So it is about the past and "was" is used.

    Do I understand it correctly?
    I don't know if I understand correctly about the two parts. Could you please tell me?
    I am not a teacher. If there is anything ungrammatical in my post, please correct it. I am grateful for your help.

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    #9

    Re: The classical Latin word is from Greek

    The point is that Old English is dead. Dead dead dead.

    Latin, while not anyone's native language, is not completely dead. It is only mostly dead. Most English speakers recognize at least some Latin words, like "et cetera." Educated English speakers use and recognize many Latin phrases. We had a whole scandal recently about "quid pro quo," for example.


    So Latin words are. Old English words were.

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    #10

    Re: The classical Latin word is from Greek

    It really does not matter whether Latin or Old English is dead. That's not the point. Being dead simply means that people don't speak it as a first language any more.

    The point is that when we study it, it is very much alive, and present as an object of study. We say that the Latin word for 'grammar' is (not was) 'grammatike'. It's no different for Old English.

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