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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    for the form of which

    grammar
    n.

    Etymology: < Old French gramaire (French grammaire), an irregular semipopular adoption (for the form of which compare Old French mire representing Latin medicum, artimaire representing Latin artem magicam or mathematicam) of Latin grammatica, ...

    (Quoted from the Oxford English Dictionary)

    ------------

    I don't understand why the writer used which there. The first word that came to my mind to use there was it.

    a. for the form of which compare Old French mire

    b. for the form of it compare Old French mire

    What different effect exists between them?
    Last edited by kadioguy; 01-Jun-2020 at 04:18.
    I am not a teacher. If there is anything ungrammatical in my post, please correct it. I am grateful for your help.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: for the form of which

    To use 'it', you'd need a new sentence.
    "Here is a new building, which has the shape of a pyramid."
    "Here is a new building. It has the shape of a pyramid." Two sentences.
    "Here is a new building, the shape of which is a pyramid."
    "Here is a new building. The shape of it is a pyramid. Two sentences.

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    #3

    Re: for the form of which

    Thank you, Raymott.

    But in the original text there isn't any other verb before "which". I mean, there is only one verb "compare" in the original, so "for the form of it compare Old French mire" would still be grammatical.

    Or do you see it this way:

    Etymology: It came/comes from ("<") Old French gramaire (French grammaire), an irregular semipopular adoption (for the form of which compare Old French mire ...


    Then we'll get two verbs and "which" will be necessary.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 01-Jun-2020 at 11:43. Reason: deleting unnecessary quote
    I am not a teacher. If there is anything ungrammatical in my post, please correct it. I am grateful for your help.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: for the form of which

    Do you mean no noun? "Which" doesn't need a verb before it. Yes, that's how I see it.

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    #5

    Re: for the form of which

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Do you mean no noun?
    I mean, normally the part before 'which' is a sentence, as in your examples. However, it seems that it is not the case in the original. So I tried to find a solution in post #3.
    Last edited by kadioguy; 01-Jun-2020 at 12:22. Reason: Fixed a typo
    I am not a teacher. If there is anything ungrammatical in my post, please correct it. I am grateful for your help.

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    #6

    Re: for the form of which

    Quote Originally Posted by kadioguy View Post
    I mean, normally the part before 'which' is a sentence, as in your examples. However, it seems that it is not the case in the original. So I tried to find a solution in post #3.
    I just thought of another way to see it:

    an irregular semipopular adoption (for the form of which compare Old French mire ...

    The pattern is similar to this:

    a book (for the kind of which I'd love to pay)

    So in this pattern the part before 'which' can be just a noun (the text in red). What do you think?
    I am not a teacher. If there is anything ungrammatical in my post, please correct it. I am grateful for your help.

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    #7

    Re: for the form of which

    Quote Originally Posted by kadioguy View Post

    Etymology: It came/comes from ("<") Old French gramaire (French grammaire), an irregular semipopular adoption (for the form of which compare Old French mire ...
    That's what is meant. Don't look for complete sentences in dictionary definitions.
    Typoman - writer of rongs

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