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Thread: To see the city

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    #1

    To see the city

    Hello.

    What expressions or verbs do native speakers use in a sentence like mine 'I went out to see the city its cobbled streets and architecture.' Does 'to do sights' and 'do the sightseeing' work here?

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: To see the city

    We don't "do the sightseeing". We "go sightseeing". You might hear someone say "I'm going out today to do all the sights ..." but "do the sights" isn't a set phrase.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: To see the city

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    We don't "do the sightseeing". We "go sightseeing". You might hear someone say "I'm going out today to do all the sights ..." but "do the sights" isn't a set phrase.
    Thank you but what do you mean by saying it is not a set phrase? If I said 'I am going out to do sights' or 'to do the sights' would my sentence be correct?

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    #4

    Re: To see the city

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    Thank you but what do you mean by saying it is not a set phrase? If I said 'I am going out to do sights' or 'to do the sights' would my sentence be correct?
    I'm pretty sure the definite article is required in the British English expression do the sights. We see the sights In American English.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #5

    Re: To see the city

    The article is required in "do the sights". What I meant by "not a set phrase" is that although you might hear native speakers use it, it's not a fixed expression - you won't find "do the sights" in a dictionary or English usage list. By "do", a native speaker would, effectively, mean "look at" or "see". Some of the "sights" might be things you do more than look at - you might take a tour or similar.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: To see the city

    I went out to see the city its 's cobbled streets and architecture.'

    The sentence is not correct as it stands as there is no link "the street" and the phrase that follows.
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

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