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  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #11

    Re: 161.5 metres high

    If you're actually saying a price, such as 25.60, you're right. GoesStation's example was more like jargon used in professional financial circles.

    Six cans of Coke cost 1.35 > Six cans of Coke cost one pound thirty-five.
    There are 1.35 pounds to the Euro > There are one point three five pounds to the Euro.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #12

    Re: 161.5 metres high

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    But I leant that when saying currency point is not used.
    25.60 twenty-five pounds sixty pence.
    Yes. There's an exception, though. In technical finance contexts, prices may be quoted with more than two decimals of precision. In such cases (and others where the everyday "twenty-five pounds sixty" convention would risk a misunderstanding), currency values are read like other numbers.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #13

    Re: 161.5 metres high

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    If you're actually saying a price, such as 25.60, you're right. GoesStation's example was more like jargon used in professional financial circles.

    Six cans of Coke cost 1.35 > Six cans of Coke cost one pound thirty-five.
    There are 1.35 pounds to the Euro > There are one point three five pounds to the Euro.
    And in British English what is the standard pronunciation of '161. 5 meters'?

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    #14

    Re: 161.5 metres high

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    And in British English what is the standard pronunciation of '161.no space5 meters'?

    one hundred and sixty-one point five metres
    Typoman - writer of rongs

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    #15

    Re: 161.5 metres high

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post

    one hundred and sixty-one point five metres
    You don't use 'a' before 'hundred' in BrE?

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    #16

    Re: 161.5 metres high

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    Don't you don't use 'a' before 'hundred' in BrE?
    Yes, we do. I just happened to use 'one' on this occasion.
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    #17

    Re: 161.5 metres high

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    Yes, we do. I just happened to use 'one' on this occasion.
    I must have confused it with another use. Before 'pound', if I remember correctly, BrE use 'one' not 'a'. Right? 'One pound twenty-five pence.'

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #18

    Re: 161.5 metres high

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    I must have confused it with another use. Before 'pound', if I remember correctly, BrE uses 'one' not 'a'. Right? 'One pound twenty-five pence.'
    That's right, unless the cost is exactly 1. Then we say either "one pound" or "a pound".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #19

    Re: 161.5 metres high

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    And in British English, what is the standard pronunciation of '161.5 metres'?
    If you're going to talk about BrE, you might as well spell "metres" the BrE way too. If I were in a particularly formal setting, I would say "one/a hundred and sixty-one point five metres", but if simply reading to myself or reading aloud in a more informal setting, I'd say "a hundred and sixty-five and a half metres".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #20

    Re: 161.5 metres high

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    If you're going to talk about BrE, you might as well spell "metres" the BrE way too. If I were in a particularly formal setting, I would say "one/a hundred and sixty-one point five metres", but if simply reading to myself or reading aloud in a more informal setting, I'd say "a hundred and sixty-five and a half metres".
    In case I had '161.20 metres.' Would it be 'one/a hundred and sixty-one point two oh meters.' Or if I had 10 would it be 'oh one'?

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