Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 Last
Results 1 to 10 of 21
  1. Key Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Georgia
      • Current Location:
      • Georgia

    • Join Date: Nov 2018
    • Posts: 1,641
    #1

    161.5 metres high

    Hello.

    Is one hundred and sixty-one and a half the correct pronunciation of 161.5 metres high in this sentence?

    The tallest part of the church is the steeple, which is 161.5 metres high.

    From English File.

  2. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Other
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 5,996
    #2

    Re: 161.5 metres high

    I might say:

    - being precise: a hundred sixty-one point five meters
    - simplifying: over a hundred and sixty meters
    - simplifying more: over a hundred sixty meters
    - being expansive: almost a hundred and sixty-two meters

    Now let's see what others say.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  3. Key Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Georgia
      • Current Location:
      • Georgia

    • Join Date: Nov 2018
    • Posts: 1,641
    #3

    Re: 161.5 metres high

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    I might say:

    - being precise: a hundred sixty-one point five meters
    - simplifying: over a hundred and sixty meters
    - simplifying more: over a hundred sixty meters
    - being expansive: almost a hundred and sixty-two meters

    Now let's see what others say.
    So point is pronounced here. When pronouncing currency it is not but when saying kilograms, etc it is. Must copy this is to my notes.

  4. Moderator
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 18,233
    #4

    Re: 161.5 metres high

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    So point is pronounced here. When pronouncing currency it is not but when saying kilograms, etc it is.
    Yes. You should generally read decimals as they're written except for currency. One sixty-one and a half isn't wrong, but most native speakers wouldn't read it that way in that context.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. Key Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Georgia
      • Current Location:
      • Georgia

    • Join Date: Nov 2018
    • Posts: 1,641
    #5

    Re: 161.5 metres high

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Yes. You should generally read decimals as they're written except for currency. One sixty-one and a half isn't wrong, but most native speakers wouldn't read it that way in that context.
    In 23. 45 kg the second digit is pronounced separately. 'Twenty-three point four five' but if they had 161.45 instead of 161.5 what would be the correct pronunciation 'four' 'five' not 'forty-five?'

  6. Moderator
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 18,233
    #6

    Re: 161.5 metres high

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    In 23.45 kg the second digit is pronounced separately. 'Twenty-three point four five' but if they had 161.45 instead of 161.5 what would be the correct pronunciation 'four' 'five' not 'forty-five?'
    "Point forty-five" isn't exactly wrong, but native speakers don't normally pronounce decimals that way.
    I am not a teacher.

  7. Key Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Georgia
      • Current Location:
      • Georgia

    • Join Date: Nov 2018
    • Posts: 1,641
    #7

    Re: 161.5 metres high

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    "Point forty-five" isn't exactly wrong, but native speakers don't normally pronounce decimals that way.
    In both cases? When saying kilograms and meters?

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 54,929
    #8

    Re: 161.5 metres high

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    In both cases? When saying kilograms and meters?
    Yes, after saying "point", we just say the individual numbers.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  9. Moderator
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 18,233
    #9

    Re: 161.5 metres high

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Yes, after saying "point", we just say the individual numbers.
    I think that's the key. "Point" is used with currencies in financial contexts like currency exchange. In such cases, the digits following the decimal point are pronounced individually. For example, In New York, simoleons were trading at thirty-seven point six four one to the dollar.
    I am not a teacher.

  10. Key Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Georgia
      • Current Location:
      • Georgia

    • Join Date: Nov 2018
    • Posts: 1,641
    #10

    Re: 161.5 metres high

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    I think that's the key. "Point" is used with currencies in financial contexts like currency exchange. In such cases, the digits following the decimal point are pronounced individually. For example, In New York, simoleons were trading at thirty-seven point six four one to the dollar.
    But I leant that when saying currency point is not used.
    25.60 twenty-five pounds sixty pence.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 Last

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •