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  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    to better understand vs to deeper understand

    Hello! Let's consider the following examples:

    I want to better understand it.
    I want to deeply understand it (not deeper).
    I want to quickly understand it (not quicker).

    I have three questions:

    1. Why do you think to deeper/quicker understand are not welcome in contrast to better?
    2. Are there any other adverbs/comparative adjectives that fit this pattern: to+adv/adj+verb?
    3. Why do you think we can't say, "I want to early/earlier arrive home" or "I want to deeper/deeply dive in the river" (at least, I couldn't find any examples)?

    I've highlighted do you think to prevent replies like, "Only grammarians and linguists could tell you why" or "That's just the way it is."
    Last edited by Alexey86; 26-Jun-2020 at 19:47. Reason: fixing a typo
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  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: to better understand vs to deeper understand

    You need "deeply" or "quickly" because they are adverbs, describing how the understanding is to be done.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: to better understand vs to deeper understand

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    You need "deeply" or "quickly" because they are adverbs, describing how the understanding is to be done.
    Is better also an adverb?
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    #4

    Re: to better understand vs to deeper understand

    Quote Originally Posted by Alexey86 View Post
    Is better also an adverb?
    What part of speech is the word that it modifies?
    I am not a teacher.

  5. Senior Member
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    #5

    Re: to better understand vs to deeper understand

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    What part of speech is the word that it modifies?
    Do you mean that better is an adverb just because it modifies understand?
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    #6

    Re: to better understand vs to deeper understand

    Quote Originally Posted by Alexey86 View Post
    Do you mean that better is an adverb just because it modifies the verb understand?
    Could better be another part of speech in the quoted sentence?
    I am not a teacher.

  7. Senior Member
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    #7

    Re: to better understand vs to deeper understand

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Could better be another part of speech in the quoted sentence?
    It functions as a noun: "Do you mean that (what? ->) better is an adverb..."

    Deeper
    also modifies the verb understand. Can we say, "I want to deeper understand it"?
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  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: to better understand vs to deeper understand

    Quote Originally Posted by Alexey86 View Post
    It functions as a noun: "Do you mean that (what? ->) better is an adverb..."

    Deeper
    also modifies the verb understand. Can we say, "I want to deeper understand it"?
    No. "Deeper" is an adjective so it has to modify a noun. You could say "I want a deeper understanding of it". There, "understanding" is a noun.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #9

    Re: to better understand vs to deeper understand

    Quote Originally Posted by Alexey86 View Post
    1. I want to better understand it.
    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    What part of speech is the word that it modifies?
    Quote Originally Posted by Alexey86 View Post
    Do you mean that better is an adverb just because it modifies understand?
    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Could better be another part of speech in the quoted sentence?
    Quote Originally Posted by Alexey86 View Post
    It functions as a noun: "Do you mean that (what? ->) better is an adverb..."
    I'm talking about the sentence I've labeled number 1 above. Can "better" be a noun in that sentence?

    Deeper [/I]also modifies the verb understand. Can we say, "I want to deeper understand it"?
    "Deeper" is an adjective. You may sometimes see a native speaker use it as an adverb, but you should not emulate them. Write I want to understand it more deeply.
    I am not a teacher.

  10. Senior Member
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    #10

    Re: to better understand vs to deeper understand

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    I'm talking about the sentence I've labeled number 1 above. Can "better" be a noun in that sentence?
    Sorry, GS, I don't follow you. Of course, better can't be a noun or a verb in that sentence.

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    "Deeper" is an adjective. You may sometimes see a native speaker use it as an adverb, but you should not emulate them. Write I want to understand it more deeply.
    So, better can be an adjective and an adverb, while deeper is always an adjective. But we can say, "I want to quickly understand it" and "I want to understand it quickly." Why can't we say, "I want to early arrive home"? Is it because early answers to the question when, not how?
    Last edited by Alexey86; 26-Jun-2020 at 21:59.
    Not a teacher or native speaker

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