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Thread: embrace

  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    embrace

    Hi everyone,

    What does "embrace" mean in the sentence below?
    This is an article from National Geographic.

    "His daughter married an American and settled in the United States. Tanabe long wrestled with the idea that she had embraced the enemy."

    Thank you,
    Higrashi

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: embrace

    It's a metaphor, as is "wrestled with". "Embrace" here means "adopt the ideology of" or, less specifically, to become a supporter, collaborator, or even a traitor.

    "2. accept (a belief, theory, or change) willingly and enthusiastically.
    "besides traditional methods, artists are embracing new technology"
    Dictionary.com
    Last edited by Raymott; 04-Jul-2020 at 03:20.

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    #3

    Re: embrace

    To accept one's enemy is something hard for anyone to come to grips with, hence the going through a period of wrestling.
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

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    #4

    Re: embrace

    It has its literal meaning as well: when she married an American, she literally embraced — in bed — a representative of the enemy.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #5

    Re: embrace

    We do also say sleep with the enemy, which is normally used metaphorically, but would both that and literal.

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