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    #1

    The pronunciation of consonants

    Hello.

    Do native speakers tend not to pronounce the final consonants 'g' in for example 'singing' or 'everlasting' or 'd' in 'bad'?

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    #2

    Re: The pronunciation of consonants

    In most dialects, the "g" in /ng/ is not pronounced as /g/. It's either merged with the "n" to form /ŋ/ or dropped. I pronounce "singing" like "singin'".

    The final consonant in "bad" is usually reduced to a palatal stop unless it's followed by a vowel -- again, in my dialect. It's never dropped altogether, but you might have to tune your ear keenly to detect it.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: The pronunciation of consonants

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    In most dialects, the "g" in /ng/ is not pronounced as /g/. It's either merged with the "n" to form /ŋ/ or dropped. I pronounce "singing" like "singin'".

    The final consonant in "bad" is usually reduced to a palatal stop unless it's followed by a vowel -- again, in my dialect. It's never dropped altogether, but you might have to tune your ear keenly to detect it.
    I was listening to the song Tidal wave by Killlers. I think the singer doesn't pronounce it at all. https://youtu.be/npTz7NJri8Q. I mean the 'd' in 'bad'.
    I also wanted to mention that I often hear an 'r' in 'I don't know.' Is there really an 'r' in 'don't'?

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    #4

    Re: The pronunciation of consonants

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    I was listening to the song Tidal wave by Killlers. I think the singer doesn't pronounce it at all. https://youtu.be/npTz7NJri8Q. I mean the 'd' in 'bad'.
    I also wanted to mention that I often hear an 'r' in 'I don't know.' Is there really an 'r' in 'don't'?
    When he sings "He's so bad/He's so bad", he barely realizes the first /d/. The second is a good example of the palatal stop that can be undetectable to an ear that's not used to hearing it. The speaker cuts off the previous vowel by pressing the top of the tongue against the hard palate, stopping the air flowing out of the mouth. The sudden stop of the vowel, compared to letting it fade gradually, is (I think, but I'm no expert) the only audible difference.

    I can't imagine where you're hearing an /r/ in "don't".
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    #5

    Re: The pronunciation of consonants

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    When he sings "He's so bad/He's so bad", he barely realizes the first /d/. The second is a good example of the palatal stop that can be undetectable to an ear that's not used to hearing it. The speaker cuts off the previous vowel by pressing the top of the tongue against the hard palate, stopping the air flowing out of the mouth. The sudden stop of the vowel, compared to letting it fade gradually, is (I think, but I'm no expert) the only audible difference.

    I can't imagine where you're hearing an /r/ in "don't".
    In this video https://youtu.be/f1FBYgk3svU at 4:02. This is not the first time I heard it.

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    #6

    Re: The pronunciation of consonants

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    In this video https://youtu.be/f1FBYgk3svU at 4:02. This is not the first time I heard it.
    At 4:02, Cate Blanchett says "I dunno." That's completely, unambiguously clear to me. Does the vowel resemble an Australian's pronunciation of something that would be spelled "durno" to you?

    Jimmy Kimmel says "I don't" ten seconds later or so. There's no trace of an /r/.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #7

    Re: The pronunciation of consonants

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    At 4:02, Cate Blanchett says "I dunno." That's completely, unambiguously clear to me. Does the vowel resemble an Australian's pronunciation of something that would be spelled "durno" to you?

    Jimmy Kimmel says "I don't" ten seconds later or so. There's no trace of an /r/.
    Yes, it does. Because I can clearly hear an 'r'. I asked my sister to listen to it and she heard it too.

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    #8

    Re: The pronunciation of consonants

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    Yes, it does. Because I can clearly hear an 'r'. I asked my sister to listen to it and she heard it too.
    I guess my ear is sufficiently tuned to the Australian accent that I just hear a /u/. I believe Aussies tend to color vowels with following Rs less than speakers of other non-rhotic accents do, to the extent that Melbourne comes out as "Melb'n". But really, strain as I might, I can't detect the hint of an R in Miss Blanchett's "dunno".

    Have you and your sister heard a lot of Australian English?
    I am not a teacher.

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    #9

    Re: The pronunciation of consonants

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    I guess my ear is sufficiently tuned to the Australian accent that I just hear a /u/. I believe Aussies tend to color vowels with following Rs less than speakers of other non-rhotic accents do, to the extent that Melbourne comes out as "Melb'n". But really, strain as I might, I can't detect the hint of an R in Miss Blanchett's "dunno".

    Have you and your sister heard a lot of Australian English?
    No, I met a lovely couple from Australia last summer. It was the only time I was able to hear native Australian English not on YouTube but in real life
    I think I hear an r in 'dunno' if it's pronounced as duh neu somewhere between h and n I hear it.

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    #10

    Re: The pronunciation of consonants

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Adams View Post
    In this video https://youtu.be/f1FBYgk3svU at 4:02. This is not the first time I heard it.
    Dunno is just a fast, informal way of saying don't know.

    I didn't hear an R. Maybe if I were Australian . . . .
    Last edited by GoesStation; 25-Jul-2020 at 23:53. Reason: Fill in a missing word.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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