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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    The embers of the fire

    Hi.

    Are my two sentences idiomatic? Will native speakers use them?

    1) The embers of the fire were still incandescent even though the flames had disappeared.
    2) The sun blazed down from an incandescent sky.

    I think 1) and 2) are okay, but a bit literary.



  2. VIP Member
    Interested in Language
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    #2

    Re: The embers of the fire

    I would call those "embers from the fire" to refer to the remnants of burning wood after the flames are extinguished.
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

  3. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    English Teacher
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    #3

    Re: The embers of the fire

    1) is painful. 2) could be described as literary.

  4. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: The embers of the fire

    If by literary you mean poetic or figurative, you're right. They're nice, but they're not very conversational.

    I agree that from is more accurate than in, but in isn't unnatural. If you love the sound of it, keep it, but if from sounds just as good, change it.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  5. Member
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    #5

    Re: The embers of the fire

    Embers of the fire is a tautology. You would need to put the sentence into the context of a longer piece to see if the usage was justified.

    As a native speaker I would be more likely to say the embers of the bonfire or the embers in the fire grate.
    Retired magazine editor and native British English speaker - not a teacher

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