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    • Join Date: Mar 2005
    • Posts: 230
    #1

    Go For It

    Dear Teachers,

    a. That’s great, she likes you, and you like her, not too much of a problem.
    - “not too much of a problem” means “not a big problem”, right?

    b. Hang out with each other some more and find out what it is that you both really want. If it matches, then I say to go for it.
    - What does “to go for it” mean in this sentence?

    Thanks a bunch

    Namsteven


    • Join Date: Jan 2006
    • Posts: 137
    #2

    Re: Go For It

    Quote Originally Posted by namsteven View Post
    Dear Teachers,
    a. That’s great, she likes you, and you like her, not too much of a problem.
    - “not too much of a problem” means “not a big problem”, right?
    b. Hang out with each other some more and find out what it is that you both really want. If it matches, then I say to go for it.
    - What does “to go for it” mean in this sentence?
    Thanks a bunch
    Namsteven

    A) "Not much of a problem" = not a big problem or I even dare to say no problem at all. I look at it as very positive news and that you are delighted about that.

    B) "to go for it" means that you have to try to start a relationship. Taking the risk in away. You have to try and take the relationship you have with the person, which is based on friendship, to a higher level.

    Kind regards

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #3

    Re: Go For It

    Quote Originally Posted by Johan[@CLT] View Post
    ...
    B) "to go for it" means that you have to try to start a relationship. Taking the risk in away. You have to try and take the relationship you have with the person, which is based on friendship, to a higher level.
    Kind regards
    Only in this context. "Go for it" has a more general meaning: "take the risk"/"take the plunge": "If you want to start your own business, go for it".

    There are some idioms where "it" has a fixed meaning - "step on it" springs to mind ("it" is the accelerator pedal, or "gas" - as some would have it ). But usually, the meaning of "it" is taken from the context: "They left the ruined man alone with a loaded gun, but he couldn't do it". [My point is that "it" here doesn't refer to anything actually mentioned in the context, but it does refer to something made clear by the situation.]

    b

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