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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    Two sentences of one context (21 words, English club)

    Hi.

    Context: I was chatting with Angela. She has a 14-year-old son who's going to take the high-school entrance exam. She wants her son to improve her spoken English and I told her that I once hosted an English club for teenagers. But I forgot to tell her that the English club is no longer existing then she asked me about it again, I said to her "My English club had been stopped due to no places". * Later we talked about her son, I said I could offer her to her son. I said "I am good at helping students improving and getting high scores". **. I wonder if both italic sentences are natural.

    More context about the sentences.

    *: I hosted an English club a few years ago. I did in my friend's coffee shop. Later the coffe shop closed so the English club had to come to an end.
    **: English tests are easy here, especially for high-school entrance exams. I've spent a few years answering questions of the test questions of high-school entrance exams so I am good at "improving students' scores" and can also help them "to get high scores".

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    #2

    Re: Two sentences of one context (21 words, English club)

    How about:

    Our English Club meetings have stopped because we have no place to hold them.

    I am good at helping students improve (their English) and get good grades/high scores.
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

  3. teechar's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Two sentences of one context (21 words, English club)

    Quote Originally Posted by Silverobama View Post
    Hi.

    Context: I was chatting with Angela. She has a 14-year-old son who's going to take the high school entrance exam. She wants her son to improve her his spoken English, and I told her that I once hosted an English club for teenagers. But I forgot to tell her that the English club is no longer exists. existing then She asked me about it again, and I said to her "My English club had been stopped due to lack of interest". no places". * Later, we talked about her son, and I said I could possibly help him. offer her to her son. I said "I am good at have experience helping students improving and getting improve their English language skills and get high scores". **. I wonder if both italic sentences are natural.

    More context about the sentences.

    *: I hosted an English club a few years ago. I did It was in my friend's coffee shop. Later, the coffee shop closed, so the English club had to come to an end.
    **: English tests are easy here, especially for high school entrance exams. I've spent a few years answering questions of the test questions of high-school entrance exams, so I am good at "improving students' scores" have experience and can also help them to get high scores.
    See above. Saying "I am good at" in such a context is self praise. Avoid that.

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    #4

    Re: Two sentences of one context (21 words, English club)

    I am puzzled what OP means by "no more existing" and "due to no places". On second thoughts, I think they mean "no more seats available due to its overwhelming popularity" rather than "a lack of interest".
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

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    #5

    Re: Two sentences of one context (21 words, English club)

    Dear teechar.

    Thanks a lot for your perfect corrections of my long long sentences. But, yes, like tedmc, I also wonder if the first sentece could be expressed in another way. I don't think the reason for the English club to stop is "lack of interest", which means that people are not interested. At that time, there were still many participants but the coffee shop renter (my friend who rented the shop) didn't want to rent it any longer. So she had to close the shop and that made the club to stop. So I said "no places", which means "no places to host the English club".

    I wonder if my new try is okay. I'll also write down your sentence for future reference (...due to lack of interest).

    My English club stopped because we couldn't find a place to carry it on at that time. (The context is clear that an English club is usually held in a specific place like KFC, Subway or something like that.)

    Please enlighten me on the italic sentence.

  6. teechar's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Two sentences of one context (21 words, English club)

    Quote Originally Posted by Silverobama View Post
    I don't think the reason for the English club to stop is "lack of interest", which means that people are were not interested. At that time, there were still many participants, but the coffee shop renter owner/manager (my friend who rented the shop) didn't want to rent it that shop any longer. So she had to close the business, shop, and that made meant the club [1] had to stop. So I said "no places", which means "no places to host the English club".
    I wonder if my new try is okay.
    No. See below.

    Quote Originally Posted by Silverobama View Post
    My English club stopped because we couldn't find a place/venue for to carry it on at that time.
    [1]: Note that we normally use the bare (not full) infinitive after "make".

  7. teechar's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Two sentences of one context (21 words, English club)

    Quote Originally Posted by tedmc View Post
    I am puzzled by/at what OP means by "no more existing" and "due to no places".
    I now see what was intended.
    See above.

  8. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Two sentences of one context (21 words, English club)

    You didn't have a place to meet. So you had to end the English club.
    Not a professional teacher

  9. teechar's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Two sentences of one context (21 words, English club)

    The question has been answered, so I'm closing this thread.

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