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  1. Lenka's Avatar

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    #1

    amalgam(ation)

    What is the difference between words "amalgam" and "amalgamation"? When do you use them?

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: amalgam(ation)

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    What is the difference between words "amalgam" and "amalgamation"? When do you use them?
    In the sense of "combination of elements" they have very similar meanings. If there is any difference there, "amalgam" is more often used when the combined elements are diverse.

  3. Lenka's Avatar

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    #3

    Re: amalgam(ation)

    I will now try to create some sentences using the words...

    1) There was a totally amalgam of some old things.
    2) English language arised from amalgamation of ... (I know I should know it.. I am sure you can answer it :)... Is it French and a language of Norman tribes? I feel ashamed I don't know it.)


    Hmm... I can't think out any examples... It still seems to me that the meaning is too similar.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: amalgam(ation)

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    I will now try to create some sentences using the words...

    1) There was a totally amalgam of some old things.
    2) English language arised from amalgamation of ... (I know I should know it.. I am sure you can answer it :)... Is it French and a language of Norman tribes? I feel ashamed I don't know it.)


    Hmm... I can't think out any examples... It still seems to me that the meaning is too similar.
    They are very close. Try these:

    (variety/diversity) English is mostly an amalgam of Norman French and Anglo-Saxon.

    (similar things) World Bank is an amalgamation of three smaller banks.

    If you switched those words, almost nobody would notice.

  5. Lenka's Avatar

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    #5

    Re: amalgam(ation)

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    They are very close. Try these:

    (variety/diversity) English is mostly an amalgam of Norman French and Anglo-Saxon.

    (similar things) World Bank is an amalgamation of three smaller banks.

    If you switched those words, almost nobody would notice.
    Thank you... By the way, you are probably quite right when you say nobody would notice it at all. It's the truth that I am not going to use these two words too often, actually :).
    Anyway, I was just interested in the difference.

  6. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: amalgam(ation)

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    Thank you... By the way, you are probably quite right when you say nobody would notice it at all. It's the truth that I am not going to use these two words too often, actually :).
    Anyway, I was just interested in the difference.
    Small caveat; in some cases they're not interchangeable. Dentists fill teeth with amalgam - this is a specialist usage (and a dentist would certainly notice if you used the other word!).

    b

  7. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: amalgam(ation)

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenka View Post
    Thank you... By the way, you are probably quite right when you say nobody would notice it at all. It's the truth that I am not going to use these two words too often, actually :).
    Anyway, I was just interested in the difference.
    You're welcome.

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