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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Idiom or Proverb

    Hi,
    I'm creating content about Thai and English idioms to be published on my work website.
    But I am not sure about the differences between idiom and proverb. Are this following sayings idioms or proverbs?

    - Kill two birds with one stone- When the cat’s away the mice will play.
    - Let a sleeping dog lie
    - A bad workman always blames his tools.
    - Make hay while the sun shines
    - Like two peas in a pod

    Thanks.
    Last edited by GoesStation; 17-Sep-2020 at 13:25. Reason: Remove link.

  2. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Idiom or Proverb

    I wouldn't call them proverbs but sayings.
    Not a professional teacher

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Idiom or Proverb

    Quote Originally Posted by Saipuwanard View Post
    Hi.

    I'm creating content about Thai and English idioms to be published on my work website no full stop here but I am not sure about the differences between idioms and proverbs. Are this the following/these sayings idioms or proverbs?

    - Kill two birds with one stone.
    - When the cat’s away, the mice will play.
    - Let a sleeping dog lie.
    - A bad workman always blames his tools.
    - Make hay while the sun shines.
    - Like two peas in a pod.

    Thanks. Unnecessary. Thank us after we help you, by clicking on the "Thank" button.
    Note my corrections and comments above.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: Idiom or Proverb

    Quote Originally Posted by Saipuwanard View Post
    But I am not sure about the differences between idiom and proverb.

    NOT A TEACHER


    There are many explanations on the Internet.

    I suggest that you start by googling the following: Merriam-Webster Learner's Dictionary idioms and proverbs.

    (I do not know how to link. Sorry!)

    Link added on behalf of TheParser: https://learnersdictionary.com/qa/th...s-proverbs-2nd


    I very much thank emsr2d2 for the link.
    Last edited by TheParser; 20-Sep-2020 at 20:38.

  5. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Idiom or Proverb

    I noticed after I posted my post that sayings is in the OP.


    Most of those sayings seem to me to be obsolete. (I think most people--especially most young people--would have trouble explaining most of them.)

    Ron: Let sleeping dogs lie.
    Don: What did you say?
    Ron: Let sleeping dogs lie.
    Don: What does that mean? Sleeping dogs can't lie. They can't talk in the first place.
    Ron: No, not that kind of lie. Don't bother a sleeping dog. It might become aggressive.
    Don: Oh.

    I think the ones most likely to be current are:

    (He (or she)) killed two birds with one stone.

    And:

    (They are like) two peas in a pod.

    Frankly, I am not sure if either is current. One, it's hard to kill one bird with one stone, much less two. Two, almost nobody knows what a pod of peas looks like anymore.

    For better or worse, a lot of sayings that used to be popular are fading away.
    Not a professional teacher

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