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    #1

    Verbal phrases

    Dear teachers,

    Please read the following:

    No.1
    If we all set________ work, we can fulfil our plan ahead of schedule.

    a. to b. about
    The answer is 'a' but I think both are correct. Is that right?

    No.2

    She was run_____ by a car and died instantly.
    a. over b. down
    The answer is 'a' and I think that's a better one because 'she died' instantly. But I think 'b' is also correct because it happens when people run down they also died. Is that right?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang


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    #2

    Re: Verbal phrases

    if we all set to work we can fulfil out plan ahead of schedule
    she was run over by a car and died isntantly

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    #3

    Re: Verbal phrases


    Thank you for your reply. I am afraid I need a teacher to explain the differences.

    Best wishes,

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by **C@RL$$** View Post
    if we all set to work we can fulfil out plan ahead of schedule
    she was run over by a car and died isntantly

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Verbal phrases

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Please read the following:

    No.1
    If we all set________ work, we can fulfil our plan ahead of schedule.

    a. to b. about
    The answer is 'a' but I think both are correct. Is that right?

    No.2

    She was run_____ by a car and died instantly.
    a. over b. down
    The answer is 'a' and I think that's a better one because 'she died' instantly. But I think 'b' is also correct because it happens when people run down they also died. Is that right?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    In the first "set to" is correct. It is a phrasal verb. "Set about" has no meaning in that context.

    Main Entry:set to
    Function:intransitive verb
    1 : to begin actively and earnestly : make an eager or determined start on a job or activity *seized a broom and set to* *set to with a will on the dinner*

    Webster's Third.

    In the second, either word is correct. "Run over" can mean "drive a vehicle over someone". That certainly fits here. But, "run down" can mean knock a person down with a vehicle. If the vehicle is moving fast enough, thjis type of accident could also be fatal.

    Any multiple choice question with more than one correct answer is a bad one. If I were forced to make a choice, I would choose "run over" because that is more likely to be instantly fatal.

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    #5

    Re: Verbal phrases

    &
    Dear Mike,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I understand No.2.
    As for No.1 I am sorry I didn't explain the confusion. The reason that I feel confused is that I read a sentence in my dictionary ' He set about his homework right after supper'. Maybe the sentence is not correct? Or is it if we use the past tense we can use the phrase and if we use present tense we can't?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    In the first "set to" is correct. It is a phrasal verb. "Set about" has no meaning in that context.

    Main Entry:set to
    Function:intransitive verb
    1 : to begin actively and earnestly : make an eager or determined start on a job or activity *seized a broom and set to* *set to with a will on the dinner*

    Webster's Third.

    In the second, either word is correct. "Run over" can mean "drive a vehicle over someone". That certainly fits here. But, "run down" can mean knock a person down with a vehicle. If the vehicle is moving fast enough, thjis type of accident could also be fatal.

    Any multiple choice question with more than one correct answer is a bad one. If I were forced to make a choice, I would choose "run over" because that is more likely to be instantly fatal.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Verbal phrases

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    &
    Dear Mike,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I understand No.2.
    As for No.1 I am sorry I didn't explain the confusion. The reason that I feel confused is that I read a sentence in my dictionary ' He set about his homework right after supper'. Maybe the sentence is not correct? Or is it if we use the past tense we can use the phrase and if we use present tense we can't?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    As someone stated earlier, "set about" is followed by a gerund -- set about doing his homework would be the correct form.

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    #7

    Re: Verbal phrases


    Dear Mike,

    Thank you very much for your reply. Now I see there is a problem with my dictionary. It seems I have to buy dictioanries compiled by native speaksers.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    As someone stated earlier, "set about" is followed by a gerund -- set about doing his homework would be the correct form.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Verbal phrases

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post

    Dear Mike,

    Thank you very much for your reply. Now I see there is a problem with my dictionary. It seems I have to buy dictionaries compiled by native speakers.

    Jiang
    LOL! That seems like a great idea.

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    #9

    Re: Verbal phrases

    &
    Dear Mike,

    Actually I have dictionaries compiled by native speaker but to read them is not as easy as I read dictionaries compiled by Chinese lexicographers. I have just consulted the phrase 'set about' in Random House Webster's Dictionary of American English and was surprised to find the following:

    set about: to begin; start: set+ about + obj: to set about one's work.
    set + about = verb-ing: to set about repariing the engines.

    Does this mean that the rule is there but people don't say so in their daily life?

    By the way, could you pleas tell me what this 'LOL' mean? I can't find it in my dictionary.

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    LOL! That seems like a great idea.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Verbal phrases

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    &
    Dear Mike,

    Actually I have dictionaries compiled by native speaker but to read them is not as easy as I read dictionaries compiled by Chinese lexicographers. I have just consulted the phrase 'set about' in Random House Webster's Dictionary of American English and was surprised to find the following:

    set about: to begin; start: set+ about + obj: to set about one's work.
    set + about = verb-ing: to set about repariing the engines.

    Does this mean that the rule is there but people don't say so in their daily life?

    By the way, could you pleas tell me what this 'LOL' mean? I can't find it in my dictionary.

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    I am also surprised to see "set about one's work". I guess it is legitimate after all.

    LOL! means "lauging out loud" in Internet slang. I appreciated your joke.

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