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  1. Member
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    #1

    Wink Henry had smoked for 10 years when he finally gave it up.

    Good afternoon, teachers.
    Could you please help me to choose the correct sentence? I wonder if we could use both of them.


    1. Henry had smoked for 10 years when he finally gave it up.
    2. Henry had been smoking for 10 years when he finally gave it up.

  2. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Henry had smoked for 10 years when he finally gave it up.

    Before we answer, perhaps you could tell us what you already know about the difference in meaning between these two sentences.

    What is it that the continuous emphasises that the simple does not?

  3. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #3

    Re: Henry had smoked for 10 years when he finally gave it up.

    You can, and you can also say gave up. However, try answering Jutfrank's question.

  4. Member
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    #4

    Re: Henry had smoked for 10 years when he finally gave it up.

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post

    What is it that the continuous emphasises that the simple does not?
    The continuous emphasises the continuation of an action or that action has just finished with a result.

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    #5

    Re: Henry had smoked for 10 years when he finally gave it up.

    Quote Originally Posted by Son Ho View Post
    The continuous emphasises the continuation of an action or that action has just finished with a result.
    The action doesn't necessarily have to finish and produce a result. Just that it continued over a period of time.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 24-Sep-2020 at 08:09. Reason: fixing typo
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

  6. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #6

    Re: Henry had smoked for 10 years when he finally gave it up.

    To be honest, I don't see the point of the continuous form here. Ten years doesn't need emphasis.

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