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  1. Member
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    #1

    Chinese Country Song

    In the blue blue sky, the white cloud sometimes is round, sometimes is flat, sometimes is just like my face [1]yo....

    Xia Jie says '[2]Didi (Brother), sing for me with your sheepherd's voice'.

    Xingxing looks a bit bashfully 'Jie (Sister), won't you laugh at me'?

    'Nah'.

    Then Xingxing starts singing with the impromptu lyrics 'in the blue blue sky'....

    Watching the video clip, I feel like my heart just turned into another white cloud floating with the song to the country in the Northwest of China where Xia Jie lives.

    [1] The word 'yo' is an auxiliary in the Chinese lyrics.

    [2] I think it is not the English culture for siblings and cousins to address each other 'sister' and 'brother' which sound like some Christians might adddress each other, but such addressings are important in traditional Chinese human relations promoted by Confucius. So I use Pinying, the Chinese phonetic spelling here. Does this make sense?
    Last edited by tree123; 21-Sep-2020 at 03:02.

  2. VIP Member
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    #2

    Re: Chinese Country Song

    Quote Originally Posted by tree123 View Post
    In the blue blue sky, the white cloud sometimes is round, sometimes is flat, sometimes is just like my face [1]yo....

    Xia Jie says '[2]Didi (Brother), sing for me with your sheepherd shepherd 's voice'.

    Xingxing, looking a bit bashfully,says, 'Jie (Sister), Won't you laugh at me?'.

    'Nah'.

    Then Xingxing starts singing with the impromptu lyrics 'in the blue blue sky...'.

    Watching the video clip, I feel like my heart just turned into another white cloud floating with the song to the country in the Northwest of China where Xia Jie lives.

    [1] The word 'yo' is an auxiliary in the Chinese lyrics.

    [2] I think it is not the English (western) culture for siblings and cousins to address each other 'sister' and 'brother', which sound like some Christians Westerners might adddress each other, but such addressings forms of address are important in traditional Chinese human relations (culture/etiquette) promoted by Confucius. So I use Pinying, the Chinese phonetic spelling here. Does this make sense?
    .
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

  3. teechar's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Chinese Country Song

    Quote Originally Posted by tree123 View Post
    won't you laugh at me'?
    This is inviting someone to laugh. It is a polite way of saying "Please laugh at me". Is that what you intended?

    Quote Originally Posted by tree123 View Post
    I don't think it is not the native English speakers address culture for siblings and cousins to address each other 'sister' and 'brother', which sound like how some Christians might address each other, but such addressings forms of address are important in traditional Chinese human relations, promoted by Confucius. So I use Pinyin, the Chinese phonetic spelling here. Does this make sense?
    You're right that in English-speaking countries, people do not typically use "brother", "sister" or any words to address their siblings or cousins.

  4. Member
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    #4

    Re: Chinese Country Song

    Quote Originally Posted by teechar View Post
    This is inviting someone to laugh. It is a polite way of saying "Please laugh at me". Is that what you intended?


    You're right that in English-speaking countries, people do not typically use "brother", "sister" or any words to address their siblings or cousins.
    I mean Xingxing is asking whether or not Xia Jie will laugh at him if he sings. He is not confident of his singing.

    Now I realize I should have said ' you won't laugh at me, will you'?
    Last edited by tree123; 22-Sep-2020 at 15:03.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Chinese Country Song

    Quote Originally Posted by tree123 View Post
    Now I realize I should have said 'You won't laugh at me, will you?'
    Note my corrections to your capitalisation and punctuation above. When a question mark is part of the quoted question, it goes inside the quotation marks. Full sentences inside quotation marks must start with a capital letter.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. teechar's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Chinese Country Song

    Quote Originally Posted by tree123 View Post
    You won't laugh at me, will you?
    Yes, that works.

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