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  1. VIP Member
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    #1

    I was lying face first and I turned over and to "lie on my back" or "to be supine".

    I was lying face first then I "turned over to lie on my back" or "to be supine".

    Is my sentence correct? If so, then what should I say if the situation is the other way around? Shoul I say "I turned back" or "flipped over" to lie face first on bed"?

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    #2

    Re: I was lying face first and I turned over and to "lie on my back" or "to be supine

    Just say: I changed from lying in a prone position to a supine position.

    Incidentally, the prone position is recommended for covid-19 patients who have breathing difficulties.
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

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    #3

    Re: I was lying face first and I turned over and to "lie on my back" or "to be supine

    'supine' is not a word many people use.

    I was lying on my stomach at first, and then rolled over to lie on my back.
    Last edited by Piscean; 29-Sep-2020 at 05:24. Reason: typo
    Typoman - writer of rongs

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    #4

    Re: I was lying face first and I turned over and to "lie on my back" or "to be supine

    You will not be at the same position on the floor if you roll over.
    To be at the same position, you turn over.

    Lie on your stomach and lie on your back will be understood by everyone.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 29-Sep-2020 at 08:08. Reason: Deleting reference to deleted post.
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: I was lying face first and I turned over and to "lie on my back" or "to be supine

    Quote Originally Posted by tedmc View Post
    You will not be at the same position on the floor if you roll over.
    And yet many native speakers would say "Roll over onto your back" to someone who was lying on their front. We would all know what they meant.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: I was lying face first and I turned over and to "lie on my back" or "to be supine

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    I was lying face down. Then I "turned over to lie on my back" or "to be supine".

    Is my sentence correct?

    It was grammatical but not natural.

    If so, then what should I say if the situation is the other way around? Should I say "I turned over" or "flipped over" to lie face down on the bed"?

    Either way, we'd usually say "rolled over" or "turned over." If it was a sudden movement, then "flipped over" is right.
    Although turned over and rolled over can have different meanings, in this context they mean the same thing.

    In a different context, sometimes we train dogs to roll over. Then the dog starts upright and finishes upright. The dog has rolled all the way over.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    #7

    Re: I was lying face first and I turned over and to "lie on my back" or "to be supine

    NOT A TEACHER


    Tufguy, I am one of those people who have long been confused by the difference between "prone" and "supine."

    I think that it is fair to say that many (most?) people here in the (United) States are confused about the difference. So it might be safer to always say something like "He was lying face down" or "He was lying face up."

    I recently taught myself how to know the difference. The word "supine" has the word "up" in it, as in "face up."

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: I was lying face first and I turned over and to "lie on my back" or "to be supine

    That's a neat trick, The Parser. I'm going to remember it. Mind you, I don't plan to use either "prone" or "supine" much in everyday conversation. For years, I just thought that lying "prone" meant simply lying flat, whether face up or face down.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #9

    Re: I was lying face first and I turned over and to "lie on my back" or "to be supine

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    That's a neat trick, The Parser. I'm going to remember it. Mind you, I don't plan to use either "prone" or "supine" much in everyday conversation. For years, I just thought that lying "prone" meant simply lying flat, whether face up or face down.
    With the discovery that proning keeping the patient face down is a big aid to recovery from serious covid-19 cases, I don't think I'll ever forget what "prone" means.
    I am not a teacher.

  10. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: I was lying face first and I turned over and to "lie on my back" or "to be supine

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    . . . Tufguy, I am one of those people who have long been confused by the difference between "prone" and "supine." . . .
    When you're supine, you're on your spine.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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