Page 4 of 4 First 1 2 3 4
Results 31 to 39 of 39
  1. Newbie
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Malayalam
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2020
    • Posts: 12
    #31

    Re: diagram same modifier modifying two simple subjects in a compound subect

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulMatthews View Post
    Are you seriously saying that this is the kind of diagram that is expected of your son, or one that you think is appropriate?
    I do not understand the question. The teacher drew similar diagram, but it had two "my" one under dog and one under cat. So, that is expected, but I was trying to find the diagram with only one "my"

  2. VIP Member
    Other
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,641
    #32

    Re: diagram same modifier modifying two simple subjects in a compound subect

    Quote Originally Posted by krishnap View Post
    I modelled my diagram off this one below from the site you pointed out

    Attachment 3669
    NOT A TEACHER

    1. In the model diagram, the words "friends" and "relatives" and "associates" are used as OBJECTS of the preposition "to." So I can understand why the word "my" is put on a slanted line to the LEFT of those three words.

    2. In your son's sentence, however, the words "dog" and "cat" are the SUBJECTS of the sentence. Therefore I think (repeat: think) that the word "my" should be on a slanted line to the RIGHT of those three words. (Excuse me for using the upper case in sentences 1 and 2, but I am having trouble trying to underline those words.)

    The poet Gertrude Stein is quoted as writing that "I really do not know that anything has ever been more exciting than diagramming sentences."

  3. Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Great Britain
      • Current Location:
      • Great Britain

    • Join Date: Mar 2016
    • Posts: 461
    #33

    Re: diagram same modifier modifying two simple subjects in a compound subect

    Quote Originally Posted by krishnap View Post
    I do not understand the question. The teacher drew similar diagram, but it had two "my" one under dog and one under cat. So, that is expected, but I was trying to find the diagram with only one "my"
    And what have you and your son learned about the structure of the sentence from your suggested diagram?

  4. Newbie
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Malayalam
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2020
    • Posts: 12
    #34

    Re: diagram same modifier modifying two simple subjects in a compound subect

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    NOT A TEACHER

    1. In the model diagram, the words "friends" and "relatives" and "associates" are used as OBJECTS of the preposition "to." So I can understand why the word "my" is put on a slanted line to the LEFT of those three words.

    2. In your son's sentence, however, the words "dog" and "cat" are the SUBJECTS of the sentence. Therefore I think (repeat: think) that the word "my" should be on a slanted line to the RIGHT of those three words. (Excuse me for using the upper case in sentences 1 and 2, but I am having trouble trying to underline those words.)

    The poet Gertrude Stein is quoted as writing that "I really do not know that anything has ever been more exciting than diagramming sentences."
    Thanks. Makes sense. Will post if the teacher takes up a similar sentence later

  5. Newbie
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Malayalam
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2020
    • Posts: 12
    #35

    Re: diagram same modifier modifying two simple subjects in a compound subect

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulMatthews View Post
    And what have you and your son learned about the structure of the sentence from your suggested diagram?
    1 qtr, 2nd grade. Do not know whether can call it structure, but till now: complete sentences, types of sentences, subjects, predicates, direct objects, subject complements, modifiers, nouns, adverbs, conjunctions. I think that is about it. They have been diagramming through each item

  6. Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Great Britain
      • Current Location:
      • Great Britain

    • Join Date: Mar 2016
    • Posts: 461
    #36

    Re: diagram same modifier modifying two simple subjects in a compound subect

    Quote Originally Posted by krishnap View Post
    1 qtr, 2nd grade. Do not know whether can call it structure, but till now: complete sentences, types of sentences, subjects, predicates, direct objects, subject complements, modifiers, nouns, adverbs, conjunctions. I think that is about it. They have been diagramming through each item
    My dog and cat are white.


    Fine, but how does the diagram you drew help you to understand how those things figure in your example?

  7. Newbie
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Malayalam
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2020
    • Posts: 12
    #37

    Re: diagram same modifier modifying two simple subjects in a compound subect

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulMatthews View Post
    My dog and cat are white.


    Fine, but how does the diagram you drew help you to understand how those things figure in your example?
    The diagramming follows rules.
    Subject and predicate goes on horiz line
    they are separated by a vertical line that cuts across the horiz line
    direct objects are separated from the simple predicate by a vertical line not cutting down the horiz
    ...
    ...

    IMHO, these rules reinforce the parts of speech in the students mind
    secondly, I think, you can understand the part of speech of the sentence (once you know diagramming) without having to explain, like, this is a subject complement ...

  8. Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Great Britain
      • Current Location:
      • Great Britain

    • Join Date: Mar 2016
    • Posts: 461
    #38

    Re: diagram same modifier modifying two simple subjects in a compound subect

    Quote Originally Posted by krishnap View Post
    The diagramming follows rules.
    Subject and predicate goes on horiz line
    they are separated by a vertical line that cuts across the horiz line
    direct objects are separated from the simple predicate by a vertical line not cutting down the horiz
    ...
    ...

    IMHO, these rules reinforce the parts of speech in the students mind
    secondly, I think, you can understand the part of speech of the sentence (once you know diagramming) without having to explain, like, this is a subject complement ...
    But nothing is labeled so how can you tell what item belongs to what part of speech or function?

    A good diagram clearly labels the categories or functions of each constituent. That is what is important.

    My advice to you is to avoid the Reed-Kellogg system (virtually no one uses it) and to learn modern tree diagrams.
    Last edited by PaulMatthews; 15-Oct-2020 at 18:29.

  9. Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Great Britain
      • Current Location:
      • Great Britain

    • Join Date: Mar 2016
    • Posts: 461
    #39

    Re: diagram same modifier modifying two simple subjects in a compound subect

    This is what Wikipedia says about the Reed-Kellogg system:

    "The connections to modern principles for constructing parse trees are present in the Reed-Kellogg diagrams, although Reed and Kellogg understood such principles only implicitly"

    This contrasts them with modern systems, implying that they are out-of-date.

    The fact is that the Reed-Kellogg method of "diagramming" sentences has been intellectually obsolete for a hundred years. I can't see any reason for preferring it to the modern system.

Page 4 of 4 First 1 2 3 4

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •