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    #1

    what the data say

    When pronouncing "what the data say", how do you transfer from "what" to "the"? /wɒt/- /ə/ - from "t" to "" there seems to be some difficulty to sound both clearly.

    ================

    Face masks: what the data say
    The science supports that face coverings are saving lives during the coronavirus pandemic, and yet the debate trundles on. How much evidence is enough?

    Source: Nature 06 OCTOBER 2020
    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-02801-8

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    #2

    Re: what the data say

    We don't release the /t/.
    Typoman - writer of rongs

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    #3

    Re: what the data say

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    We don't release the /t/.
    Does it mena /t/ can be omitted? Or does it mean /t/ is still there for a very, very short time?

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    #4

    Re: what the data say

    It means that the tongue stops the airflow from the lungs at the alveolar ridge, but is not released until the onset of the /ə/. The explosive /t/ that we hear in, for example, 'letter' is not heard.
    Typoman - writer of rongs

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    #5

    Re: what the data say

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    It means that the tongue stops the airflow from the lungs at the alveolar ridge, but is not released until the onset of the /ə/. The explosive /t/ that we hear in, for example, 'letter' is not heard.

    I understand "not released until the onset of the /ə/" as "not released until the onset of the /ə/ - at this moment, /t/ and // will be released at the same time."

    So it sounds more difficult to pronounce: How could /t/ and // be sounded at the same time? When I pronounced "what the data say" slowly, Google recognized my voice with 100% accuracy. When I read it aloud fast, it fails to discern it.

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    #6

    Re: what the data say

    Quote Originally Posted by GoodTaste View Post
    I understand "not released until the onset of the /ə/" as "not released until the onset of the /ə/ - at this moment, /t/ and // will be released at the same time."
    I didn't say that. The tongue moves down from the alveolar ridge to the back of the upper teeth. The // does not begin util after the /t/ has stopped.

    If you want to hear this unreleased /t/, get a native speaker of BrE say both 'what the data' and 'bother data' as naturally as they can. You should be able to detect some form of stop in the first words that you don't hear in the second.


    Incidentally, some people will utter the /t/ as a glootal rather than an alveolar stop. The stop is still there.
    Typoman - writer of rongs

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    #7

    Re: what the data say

    // is a voiced phoneme. The preceding /t/ stops the flow of air, which resumes when you pronounce the //. It's not difficult for a native speaker.
    I am not a teacher.

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