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  1. Phaedrus's Avatar
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    #31

    Re: Strong as he is (meanings)

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    It might not be relevant to this discussion, but there's a sentence the construction of which I have difficulty explaining to my students:

    Living as I do in such a remote place, I seldom have visitors.
    That use of as, as I see it, is much different. Semantically, it is the type of as we find in sentences like Daniel LaRusso does karate as Mr. Miyagi did, or Do unto others as you would have them do unto you, or in the military command As you were!, which tells troops to return to the posture they were in prior to the entrance of someone of superior rank. As signifies manner in all these examples and may be paraphrased "in the manner that."

    Syntactically, however, as I do in your example functions as a parenthetical and should really be set off with commas:

    Living, as I do, in such a remote place, I seldom have visitors.
    Living in such a remote place, as I do, I seldom have visitors.

    Another option is to make Living as I do the main idea, in which case in such a remote place would become the parenthetical element: Living as I do, in such a remote place, I seldom have visitors. In either case, as has nothing to do with the living-phrase's being a clause of reason, which it would be even if as I do were not there: Living in such a remote place, I seldom have visitors. As I do simply comments on the reality of the situation. Contrast:

    Living, as I wish I did, in such a remote place, I would seldom have visitors.

  2. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #32

    Re: Strong as he is (meanings)

    Quote Originally Posted by Alexey86 View Post
    The (as) adjective + as + subject + be pattern confuses me sometimes. Are the pairs below correct and equivalent in meaning?

    1a Strong as he is, he can't lift it.
    1b He can't lift it despite his strength.

    2a Strong as he is, he can lift it.
    2b He can lift it due to his strength.

    3a Strong as he is, no one can beat him.
    3b No one can beat him because of his strength.

    4a Strong as he is, he should train every day.
    4b No matter how strong he is, he should train every day.

    (All examples are mine.)
    They all work. That phrasing is used more often in the sense of 1 and 3.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  3. Phaedrus's Avatar
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    #33

    Re: Strong as he is (meanings)

    Quote Originally Posted by Phaedrus View Post
    (1) Wet as the floor is, people could very easily slip on it.
    (2) Wet as the floor is, there is little risk of people slipping on it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Alexey86 View Post
    (1) and (2) make perfect sense to me because it refers anaphoricaly. Anaphora sets up a semantic bond between the clauses. Maybe this is more important than whether a sentence has one or more subjects. 'Strong as John is, Bill can lift it easily' has no anaphora, that's why it comes across as a random combination of clauses and doesn't make much sense without 'being as'.
    I agree with you, Alexey, that the clauses shouldn't give the impression of being randomly combined.

    However, that point holds for any combination of clauses where one clause is syntactically subordinated to another. I really don't think the relationship between an "as"-clause with preposing and the main clause needs to be anaphoric. The following examples illustrate this:

    (3) Strong as John is, Steve has the muscles we need. (contrastive/concessive)
    (4) Strong as Apollo Creed was, Rocky had a lot of training to do. (circumstantial)

    In (3) and (4), no pronouns are used, and each clause makes no reference to the other. Nevertheless, they are related. Sentence (3) means "Even though John is strong, Steve has the muscles we need," and (4) means "With Apollo Creed being as strong as he was, Rocky had a lot of training to do."

    Also, remember that the subject of the main clause is not being compared to the subject of the "as"-clause. Just as "Strong as John is, Bill can lift it easily" does not imply that Bill is as strong as John, so also (2) does not imply that people are as wet as the floor is, or (4) that Rocky was as strong as Apollo Creed.

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    #34

    Re: Strong as he is (meanings)

    Quote Originally Posted by Phaedrus View Post
    However, that point holds for any combination of clauses where one clause is syntactically subordinated to another. I really don't think the relationship between an "as"-clause with preposing and the main clause needs to be anaphoric. The following examples illustrate this:

    (3) Strong as John is, Steve has the muscles we need. (contrastive/concessive)
    (4) Strong as Apollo Creed was, Rocky had a lot of training to do. (circumstantial)

    In (3) and (4), no pronouns are used, and each clause makes no reference to the other. Nevertheless, they are related. Sentence (3) means "Even though John is strong, Steve has the muscles we need," and (4) means "With Apollo Creed being as strong as he was, Rocky had a lot of training to do."
    You're right, anaphoric reference isn't necessary, but if we use it, the meaning will shift from contrastive to circumstantial and vice versa:

    Strong as John is, Steve has the muscles we need. (contrastive/concessive)
    Strong as John is, he has the muscle we need. (circumstantial)

    Strong as Apollo Creed was, Rocky had a lot of training to do. (circumstantial)
    Strong as Apollo Creed was, he had a lot of training to do. (contrastive/concessive)

    What do you think?
    Last edited by Alexey86; 17-Oct-2020 at 23:32.
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  5. Phaedrus's Avatar
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    #35

    Re: Strong as he is (meanings)

    Quote Originally Posted by Alexey86 View Post
    You're right, anaphoric reference isn't necessary, but if we use it, the meaning will shift from contrastive to circumstantial and vice versa: . . . What do you think?
    Although I find your attempt to come up with such a generalization commendable, Alexey, I don't think that that particular generalization holds true.

    (5) Popular as he is, he will have an easy time winning the election. (circumstantial)
    (6) Popular as he is, he will have a difficult time winning the election. (contrastive/concessive)

    In both (5) and (6), the two instances of he are co-referent. The only difference is that (5) uses an easy time and (6) a difficult time. If my fellow natives join me in finding (5) and (6) equally acceptable, the anaphoric relationship between the clauses must make no difference in how the as-clauses are interpreted.
    Last edited by Phaedrus; 18-Oct-2020 at 07:28. Reason: typo: "off"->"of"

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    #36

    Re: Strong as he is (meanings)

    Quote Originally Posted by Phaedrus View Post
    (5) Popular as he is, he will have an easy time winning the election. (circumstantial)
    (6) Popular as he is, he will have a difficult time winning the election. (contrastive/concessive)

    ...the anaphoric relationship between the clauses must make no difference in how the as-clauses are interpreted.
    If we change reference we'll change the type of as-clause. And making things more complicated, if we insert a comparison in a contrastive non-anaphoric sentence, it'll become circumstantial (5a -> 5b). But if we insert a comparison in a circumstantial non-anaphoric sentence, it'll become contrasive (6a -> 6b):

    (5) Popular as he is, he will have an easy time winning the election. (anaphoric/circumstantial)
    (5a) Popular as John is, Bill will have an easy time winning the election. (non-anaphoric//contrastive/concessive)
    (5b) Being as popular as John is, Bill will have an easy time winning the election. (non-anaphoric/circumstantial)

    (6) Popular as he is, he will have a difficult time winning the election. (anaphoric//contrastive/concessive)
    (6a) Popular as John is, Bill will have a difficult time winning the election. (non-anaphoric/circumstantial)
    (6b) Being as popular as John is, Bill will have a difficult time winning the election. (non-anaphoric/contrastive)
    Last edited by Alexey86; 18-Oct-2020 at 10:32.
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    #37

    Re: Strong as he is (meanings)

    Is it time for this thread to be moved to Linguistics?
    Typoman - writer of rongs

  8. Phaedrus's Avatar
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    #38

    Re: Strong as he is (meanings)

    Quote Originally Posted by Alexey86 View Post
    If we change reference we'll change the type of as-clause. And making things more complicated, if we insert a comparison in a contrastive non-anaphoric sentence, it'll become circumstantial (5a -> 5b). But if we insert a comparison in a circumstantial non-anaphoric sentence, it'll become contrasive (6a -> 6b):

    (5) Popular as he is, he will have an easy time winning the election. (anaphoric/circumstantial)
    (5a) Popular as John is, Bill will have an easy time winning the election. (non-anaphoric//contrastive/concessive)
    (5b) Being as popular as John is, Bill will have an easy time winning the election. (non-anaphoric/circumstantial)

    (6) Popular as he is, he will have a difficult time winning the election. (anaphoric//contrastive/concessive)
    (6a) Popular as John is, Bill will have a difficult time winning the election. (non-anaphoric/circumstantial)
    (6b) Being as popular as John is, Bill will have a difficult time winning the election. (non-anaphoric/contrastive)
    Remember, the type with "being" -- exemplified by (5b) and (6b) -- is a completely different type of "as"-clause. You can't conclude anything about the type of "as"-clause that we're talking about, which is not a comparative structure, by looking at clauses of that other type.

    Regarding your conclusions about (5a) and (6a), suppose John is a celebrity who is on Bill's campaign team. Doesn't the interpretation change from contrastive/concessive to circumstantial in the case of (5a), and from circumstantial to contrastive/concessive in the case of (6a)?

    Native speakers aren't performing advanced calculus with anaphora here. We're simply attending to meaning in context.
    Last edited by Phaedrus; 18-Oct-2020 at 12:53. Reason: OK, l shall accept this thread's being moved to the almost-never-visited Linguistics sub-forum. I shall not jump ship.

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    #39

    Re: Strong as he is (meanings)

    Quote Originally Posted by Phaedrus View Post
    Remember, the type with "being" -- exemplified by (5b) and (6b) -- is a completely different type of "as"-clause. You can't conclude anything about the type of "as"-clause that we're talking about, which is not a comparative structure, by looking at clauses of that other type.
    Sorry, maybe I'm missing something, but that's exactly what I was talking about: making a comparative sentence by adding "being", we change the type of as-clause.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phaedrus View Post
    Regarding your conclusions about (5a) and (6a), suppose John is a celebrity who is on Bill's campaign team. Doesn't the interpretation change from contrastive/concessive to circumstantial in the case of (5a), and from circumstantial to contrastive/concessive in the case of (6a)?
    I agree that only wider context can clarify the type of as-clause. Given that as + adj + as means to the extent that/of, and that extent can be either great or little (which means that popular as he is can mean popular to a little extent as he is) we've come to at least twelve options:

    (5) Popular as he is, he will have an easy time winning the election. (anaphoric/circumstantial)
    (5a) Popular as he is (= surprisingly, but although he's unpopular), he will have an easy time winning the election. (anaphoric/contrastive)
    (5b) Popular as John is, Bill will have an easy time winning the election. (non-anaphoric//contrastive/concessive)
    (5c) Popular as John is, Bill will have an easy time winning the election. (non-anaphoric/circumstantial)
    (5d) Being as popular as John is, Bill will have an easy time winning the election. (comparative/non-anaphoric/circumstantial)
    (5e) Being as popular as John is, Bill will have an easy time winning the election. (comparative/non-anaphoric/contrastive)

    (6) Popular as he is, he will have a difficult time winning the election. (anaphoric//contrastive/concessive)
    (6a) (ironically) Popular as he is (= given his unpopularity), he will have a difficult time winning the election. (anaphoric/circumstantial)
    (6b) Popular as John is, Bill will have a difficult time winning the election. (non-anaphoric/circumstantial)
    (6c) Popular as John is, Bill will have a difficult time winning the election. (non-anaphoric/contrastive/concessive)
    (6d) Being as popular as John is, Bill will have a difficult time winning the election. (comparative/non-anaphoric/contrastive)
    (6e) Being as popular as John is, Bill will have a difficult time winning the election. (comparative/non-anaphoric/circumstantial)

    Phew!
    Last edited by Alexey86; 18-Oct-2020 at 13:48.
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    #40

    Re: Strong as he is (meanings)

    I'd say that 5a and 6a are very unlikely, 5d, 5e. 6e and 6e are very unnatural, 6b ad 6c are unlikely.

    Your theoretical linguist may have twelve options, but the majority would never be uttered by most native speakers.
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