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  1. Member
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    #1

    She was dancing like a peacock

    Simple: She was dancing like a peacock.

    Complex: a) She was dancing as a peacock does.

    b) She was dancing as if she were a peacock.

    Are both a) and b) correct?

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    #2

    Re: She was dancing like a peacock

    Yes. A native speaker would be more likely to utter B than A, but A is definitely possible.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: She was dancing like a peacock

    But if we're talking about likelihood, a native speaker is far more likely to use the "simple" version. Generally, we say what we mean in the simplest way, and with the fewest words possible.

    Mind you, I've never seen a peacock dance, so I don't know if I'd recognise a person dancing like one.

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    #4

    Re: She was dancing like a peacock

    I've only seen peacocks strutting.

  5. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #5

    Re: She was dancing like a peacock

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    But if we're talking about likelihood, a native speaker is far more likely to use the "simple" version. Generally, we say what we mean in the simplest way, and with the fewest words possible.
    Making something more complex for no reason doesn't strike me as good style.

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    #6

    Re: She was dancing like a peacock

    Well, to me, the three sentences don't mean exactly the same thing!!

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    #7

    Re: She was dancing like a peacock

    Quote Originally Posted by AminMoss View Post
    Well, to me, the three sentences don't mean exactly the same thing!
    Could you explain please?
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 25-Oct-2020 at 17:21. Reason: editing the quote

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    #8

    Re: She was dancing like a peacock

    Quote Originally Posted by AminMoss View Post
    Well, to me, the three sentences don't mean exactly the same thing!!
    The sentence definitely doesn't need two exclamation marks. I don't think it merits even one.
    Typoman - writer of rongs

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    #9

    Re: She was dancing like a peacock

    Grammar aside remember that a peacock is male. In colloquial English you can compare a flamboyant man with a peacock but not a female.
    Retired magazine editor and native British English speaker - not a teacher

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    #10

    Re: She was dancing like a peacock

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterCW View Post
    Grammar aside remember that a peacock is male.
    True, but for many native speakers, peacock is the name of the species.
    In colloquial English you can compare a flamboyant man with a peacock but not a female.
    I suspect that many native speakers can, in colloquial speech.
    Typoman - writer of rongs

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