Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Comma question

  1. Newbie
    Academic
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Oct 2020
    • Posts: 7
    #1

    Comma question

    Hello!
    Another comma question...

    Would you add a comma to this sentence?

    Dr. Smith successfully established the in vitro culture of Trillium microsporocytes and successfully analyzed their meiotic events using both cytogenetic and biochemical approaches.

  2. Moderator
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 20,113
    #2

    Re: Comma question

    No. It's fine as it is.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Moderator
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 30,989
    #3

    Re: Comma question

    sofiapwn, we always want you to tell us the source and author of any text you quote.

    Why do you think the sentence needs a comma?

  4. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Other
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 7,568
    #4

    Re: Comma question

    Quote Originally Posted by sofiapwn View Post
    Hello!
    Another comma question...

    Would you add a comma to this sentence?

    Dr. Smith successfully established the in vitro culture of Trillium microsporocytes and successfully analyzed their meiotic events using both cytogenetic and biochemical approaches.
    That sentence has a series of two items. Dr. Smith did two things:

    1. established the in vitro culture.

    2. analyzed their meiotic events.

    We only use commas in series of more than two:

    - a cat and a canary (two items: no comma)
    - a cat, a canary, and a hyena (three items: two commas)

    So what about the last phrase: using . . . both approaches? Should a comma be before it?

    The answer depends on whether the doctor used both approaches for #1 and #2 or only #2. If he used them for both #1 and #2, then a comma would be needed. But if he only used them for #2, then it's correct as written.

    I'll assume that it is.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •