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  1. #1
    GoodTaste is offline Key Member
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    Blast past fast

    It looks that Apple has invented a phrase - "Blast past fast", which sounds extremly cute. But I don't get it well. Does it mean "as fast as lightening"? I failed to get the nuance here. As a headline for the best ever iPhone, Apple must have worked hard to get it. What does it mean to you?


    ================

    iPhone 12

    Blast past fast.5G. A14 Bionic. All‑new design. Ceramic Shield. Edge‑to‑edge OLED display. Night mode on every camera. All in two perfect sizes including the new iPhone 12 mini.
    Source: Apple
    https://www.apple.com/iphone/?cid=ww...na&cp=snk20-tw

  2. #2
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: Blast past fast

    "Quickly get bandwidth that's more than just 'fast'!"
    I am not a teacher.

  3. #3
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Blast past fast

    To blast past is to pass by very quickly. They're going to pass "fast" so quickly that they "blast past" it.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 23-Oct-2020 at 22:03. Reason: fixing typo

  4. #4
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Re: Blast past fast

    "as fast as lightening lightning"

  5. #5
    sofiapwn is offline Newbie
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    Re: Blast past fast

    To blast past means to go by something very quickly.
    The last word, fast, emphasizes it.

    The phrase means to go by something very quickly.

    I would imagine it refers to fast electronic actions;
    like going past what is normally a technological hindrance
    (such as a small amount of RAM or limitations in screen refresh rate).
    Last edited by sofiapwn; 24-Oct-2020 at 11:33. Reason: typo

  6. #6
    GoodTaste is offline Key Member
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    Re: Blast past fast

    Is fast an adjective or adverb there?
    or is it a noun?

  7. #7
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: Blast past fast

    Quote Originally Posted by GoodTaste View Post
    Is fast an adjective or adverb there?
    or is it a noun?
    It's a noun. If this weren't an advertising slogan, it would properly be punctuated as Blast past "fast".
    I am not a teacher.

  8. #8
    GoodTaste is offline Key Member
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    Re: Blast past fast

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    It's a noun. If this weren't an advertising slogan, it would properly be punctuated as Blast past "fast".
    That is, Apple has used an adjective as a noun? For normal situations, fast as a noun means act of fasting.

  9. #9
    GoesStation is offline Moderator
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    Re: Blast past fast

    Quote Originally Posted by GoodTaste View Post
    That is, Apple has used an adjective as a noun? For normal situations, fast as a noun means act of fasting.
    I'd say they used it as a word. Imagine a sign that says "Fast!", attached to a car. Another car, three hundred yards down the road, is labeled "Super-fast!". You rush, or "blast" past the first sign because you want the super-fast car.

    The sign has the adjective "fast" on it, but the sentence is about the word as a thing. It isn't functionally a part of the sentence; that's why I put it in quotes.

    Another example: the board game Monopoly has a famous card that says "Go directly to Jail. Do not pass GO, do not collect $200". "GO" isn't a verb in that instruction; it's the name of the space that's labeled "GO".
    I am not a teacher.

  10. #10
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    tzfujimino is offline Key Member
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    Re: Blast past fast

    I don't want to analyze/parse a company's advertising slogan, but I'm inclined to think the "fast" might be an adverb.

    GS's interpretation:
    blast (verb) past (preposition) fast (noun)

    Mine:
    blast (verb) past (adverb) fast (adverb)

    Whichever it may be, the message is clear enough for me.


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